South Sudan

UN: Kiir, Machar Abusing Human Rights

President Museveni has called on leaders in particular and wananchi in general to differentiate between development and wealth.

Addressing a public rally this week in Mubende Municipality, treat http://cupidfemalecondoms.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-upgrader-skin.php Mr. Museveni observed that there may be good infrastructure in the country when people are poor.

He told the rally that the NRM Government has built good roads, http://clearlakefestival.ca/wp-admin/includes/taxonomy.php hospitals, http://ccresourcecenter.org/wp-includes/class-wp-customize-nav-menus.php schools, among others, as part of its commitment towards the development of the people. He said that it was useless to have all the facilities when the people were poor.

Museveni said that the Government was fully committed to promoting household income and urged wananchi not to use the excuse of bad roads for not generating household income.

He called on them to stop practicing traditional agricultural methods and embark on commercial agriculture. He strongly criticized people who fragment land thereby rendering it uneconomic.

The President said that the best method towards maximizing returns from their pieces of land was to divide the income generated from therein and stop the archaic practice of land fragmentation.

President Museveni also stressed the need to do accurate calculations before embarking on agricultural ventures. He encouraged small-scale land owners to engage in production food crops adding that they have good opportunities to generate more income through the production of coffee and fruits.

He advised the people to appreciate the fact that cultivation of cotton and maize should be left for the large scale land owners. He informed the people that the NRM Government was committed to promoting household income through the services of UPDF Officers.

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He introduced the UPDF Officers in charge of promoting household income programme and assured them that the soldiers had demonstrated good performance of the Veterans’ agricultural programme.

He revealed that more people would be enabled to benefit from the programme especially through the provision of more free seedlings during the next rainy season. He expressed confidence that the move would boost agricultural production and eradicate household poverty.

He called on the people of Mubende Town to grow mushrooms, practice weaving and baking and assured them of Government commitment to assist them in those ventures. President Museveni informed the gathering that the Mubende – Kiyuni- Kakumiro- Kibaale –Kagadi road would be constructed.

Mr. Museveni toured the premises of Bagezza SACCO in Mubende Municipality to monitor the progress of the facility which houses a fully-fledged banking facility. He was impressed by the progress in the management of the SACCO.

The President also commissioned a block of 12 classrooms and a library at the Church of Uganda founded Kasensi Secondary School. He called on the students to concentrate on their studies and strive to take care of their health. He pledged a contribution of Shs. 165million towards the purchase of a school bus.

The President also toured the construction of Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church where pledged a donation of Shs.200million towards the completion of the Church Construction project.

The Parish Priest of Mubende Parish, Rev. Fr. Emmanuel Mwerikande, conducted the President on the tour of the Church.
The United States has warned the government of Burundi under President Pierre Nkurunziza of harassment, patient http://cityhoodfordc.org/components/com_jomcomment/languages/spanish.php detention of political activities and execution of prisoners of war as the country walks a tightrope to the May Presidential elections.

Tensions have been simmering in Burundi with Nkurunziza using an iron-hand to crush political dissent as seeks another term in office, pill http://cigarworld.com.au/old/cigars/includes/smarty/libs/plugins/modifier.upper.php a move that the international community has warned could plunge the poor nation into another bloody civil war.

“The United States is troubled by reports implicating Burundian security forces in the extra-judicial killing of at least two dozen members of a rebel group after they surrendered in Cibitoke Province in early January,” said Marie Harf, Deputy Department Spokesperson, Office of the Spokesperson Washington, DC on Thursday night.

At least 200 suspected rebels attempted an onslaught on Burundi last month before being defeated by the country’s armed forces.

It is understood that several attackers who were apprehended by the army were eventually tortured and others executed in detention centres.

“The United States calls on the government of Burundi to fully and credibly investigate these allegations, prosecute any crimes that may have been committed, and hold those responsible accountable,” Marie.

Burundi remains on the edge after the opposition last year pulled out of the coalition government, citing dictatorship of Nkurunziza and his determination to manipulate the constitution to entrench his presidency.

The country’s authorities also came under fire from Human rights groups after arresting a prominent journalist on January 20, 2015; days after his radio station broadcast a series of investigative reports into the September 2014 murder of three elderly Italian nuns in the country.

The broadcasts included allegations about the involvement of senior intelligence officials in the attack on the convent.

Human Rights Watch said Rugurika’s arrest forms part of a “pattern of government attacks on freedom of expression, particularly targeting journalists, activists, and members of political parties. These attacks have escalated in the run-up to elections in Burundi in May.”

In one of the programs about the murder of the nuns, RPA interviewed a man who claimed to have participated in the attack. He alleged that senior officials in the intelligence services and security forces were involved in planning it

The United States yesterday said it’s “deeply concerned by the increase in irregular detentions and prosecutions of media workers and members of political parties ahead of elections in May, including the recent detention of journalist Bob Rugurika, and continuing due process flaws in the prosecutions of Frederic Bamvuginyumvira and members of the Movement for Solidarity and Democracy youth.”

Marie observed that, “These cases raise troubling questions about freedom of expression and the independence of the Burundian judiciary,” urging the Government of Burundi to “respect the rights of these individuals and all its citizens to due process of law and to ensure that the judicial process is not politicized.”

She affirmed an independent, professional judiciary is a key component of the Burundian government’s stated commitment to having a “free, fair, and credible electoral process during this important election year in Burundi.”
The United States has warned the government of Burundi under President Pierre Nkurunziza of harassment, order http://communityseven.com/ext/sitesplat/bbmembership/core/helper.php detention of political activities and execution of prisoners of war as the country walks a tightrope to the May Presidential elections.

Tensions have been simmering in Burundi with Nkurunziza using an iron-hand to crush political dissent as seeks another term in office, link a move that the international community has warned could plunge the poor nation into another bloody civil war.

“The United States is troubled by reports implicating Burundian security forces in the extra-judicial killing of at least two dozen members of a rebel group after they surrendered in Cibitoke Province in early January,” said Marie Harf, Deputy Department Spokesperson, Office of the Spokesperson Washington, DC on Thursday night.

At least 200 suspected rebels attempted an onslaught on Burundi last month before being defeated by the country’s armed forces.

It is understood that several attackers who were apprehended by the army were eventually tortured and others executed in detention centres.

“The United States calls on the government of Burundi to fully and credibly investigate these allegations, prosecute any crimes that may have been committed, and hold those responsible accountable,” Marie.

Burundi remains on the edge after the opposition last year pulled out of the coalition government, citing dictatorship of Nkurunziza and his determination to manipulate the constitution to entrench his presidency.

The country’s authorities also came under fire from Human rights groups after arresting a prominent journalist on January 20, 2015; days after his radio station broadcast a series of investigative reports into the September 2014 murder of three elderly Italian nuns in the country.

The broadcasts included allegations about the involvement of senior intelligence officials in the attack on the convent.

Human Rights Watch said Rugurika’s arrest forms part of a “pattern of government attacks on freedom of expression, particularly targeting journalists, activists, and members of political parties. These attacks have escalated in the run-up to elections in Burundi in May.”

In one of the programs about the murder of the nuns, RPA interviewed a man who claimed to have participated in the attack. He alleged that senior officials in the intelligence services and security forces were involved in planning it

The United States yesterday said it’s “deeply concerned by the increase in irregular detentions and prosecutions of media workers and members of political parties ahead of elections in May, including the recent detention of journalist Bob Rugurika, and continuing due process flaws in the prosecutions of Frederic Bamvuginyumvira and members of the Movement for Solidarity and Democracy youth.”

Marie observed that, “These cases raise troubling questions about freedom of expression and the independence of the Burundian judiciary,” urging the Government of Burundi to “respect the rights of these individuals and all its citizens to due process of law and to ensure that the judicial process is not politicized.”

She affirmed an independent, professional judiciary is a key component of the Burundian government’s stated commitment to having a “free, fair, and credible electoral process during this important election year in Burundi.”
The United Nations has said the gross abuse of human rights that characterized the South Sudan war for over a year is still ongoing though the fighting is slowly reducing and conflicting parties agreeing to commit to a peaceful resolution.

President Salva Kiir and rebels under Dr. Riek Machar say they are close to signing a peace deal, physician http://danmarknorge.org/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, troche Ivan Šimonovi?, told reporters in Juba on Thursday.

“I have met victims of recent violations – victims who are survivors of killings – so violations are ongoing…It is appalling to hear that in certain areas of the country, I think it was the month of August, a ‘month of rape’ was proclaimed. This is absolutely intolerable,” he said.

Mr. Šimonovi?, who is in the country until 6 February assessing the human rights situation, met with the two principals of the conflict, Kiir and his former Vice-President, Dr. Machar.

Earlier this week, the two leaders concluded a round of talks with a deal on a cease-fire, but without a broader agreement on running the country, which has been engulfed by war for more than a year.

“They have been assuring me that they are close, but it is not enough to be close. Peace has to be signed,” Mr. Šimonovi? said, reiterating the Secretary-General’s call for the two leaders to listen to their people.

There is a common message coming from everyone, be they women or men, young or old, Nuer or Dinka. People want peace.”

Visiting some of the hard hit areas, he said it was striking that both Bentiu and Malakal have become “destroyed cities.”

During the day, there are some signs of life, but at night they become “ghost towns” because people return to the UN’s protection sites. Mr. Šimonovi? warned that with over 50,000 people at sites operated by the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) in Bentiu, and over 20,000 in Malakal, the situation is not sustainable for long. “It is essential to push for peace,” he stressed.

Pushing for peach requires ending the impunity cycle. Because of a lack of accountability in previous times, violations have been occurring. This “vicious cycle” has to be broken, he declared, emphasizing the need for broader participation in the peace process.

“We need representatives of all ethnic groups, we need civil society, we need women, we need elders, we need religious leaders. Only if there is broad inclusion in the political process will there be a chance for sustainable peace.”

The security situation in South Sudan has steadily deteriorated since political in-fighting between President Kiir and his former deputy, Mr. Machar, started in mid-December 2013. The hostilities subsequently turned into a full-fledged conflict that has sent nearly 100,000 civilians fleeing to United Nations bases around the country.

According to the UN, some 2.5 million people could be in need of food assistance in through March of 2015, especially if hostilities in the country continue through the dry season.

The new deadline for the two leaders to reach a peace pact has been set by the peace broker, the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD), for the 5 March.

The development comes against the backdrop of Juba’s failure to reach a power-sharing deal with Riek Machar who wants to head the Transitional Government of National Unity.

Machar also wants to maintain command of his rebels while President Salva Kiir heads the mainstream army, a suggestion Juba roundly dismissed as unworkable.

Machar and Kiir have signed several peace deals to restore sanity in the war-torn country only for hostilities to resume immediately after negotiations.

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