People

Mirundi Fires Back at Kagingo

The Minister for Justice and Constitutional Affairs, pills visit this site http://chios.ro/wp-admin/includes/image-edit.php Maj. Gen. Kahinda Otafiire has blasted media houses that have concentrated their reporting on matters concerning sacked Premier, http://cornerstone-edge.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-get-post-v1-1-endpoint.php John Patrick Amama Mbabazi, saying they are infringing his right of privacy.

The Minister who was addressing a press conference today at the Media Centre in Kampala said some media houses have gone past reporting about him and have reached an extent of practically harassing him by reporting lies about him.

“Leave him in peace. What has he done to deserve this harassment from you journalists?” wondered Otafiire.

Otafiire said Mbabazi, who took leave from office as NRM Secretary General weeks after being replaced as Prime Minister, must be suffering with all the infringement on his privacy.

The flamboyant Minister further refuted reports that he is planning to stand for the position of Secretary General of the ruling National Resistance Movement.

“I will not jump the river before reaching the bridge,” he added.

It should be remembered that Hon. Kahinda Otafiire was one of the top contenders of the position of Secretary General during the dramatic September 2010 NRM delegates’ conference at Namboole in which Mbabazi emerged winner, cementing the rivalry between the two NRM/A historicals.

Observers say Otafiire’s remarks should be taken with a pinch of salt as he is a known enemy of Mbabazi.

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He and Gender Minister Mary Karooro Okurut recently told a gathering in western Uganda that “we will not allow someone in NRM to pull down our leader. He keeps pulling his (Museveni) trousers.”

While the two ministers did not mention names, they are thought to have been referring to Mbabazi.
The Minister for Justice and Constitutional Affairs, case http://concernedafricascholars.org/wp-includes/bookmark.php Maj. Gen. Kahinda Otafiire has blasted media houses that have concentrated their reporting on matters concerning sacked Premier, discount http://creamiicandy.com/wp-admin/includes/deprecated.php John Patrick Amama Mbabazi, http://deltadiner.com/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/templates/checkout/review-order.php saying they are infringing his right of privacy.

The Minister who was addressing a press conference today at the Media Centre in Kampala said some media houses have gone past reporting about him and have reached an extent of practically harassing him by reporting lies about him.

“Leave him in peace. What has he done to deserve this harassment from you journalists?” wondered Otafiire.

Otafiire said Mbabazi, who took leave from office as NRM Secretary General weeks after being replaced as Prime Minister, must be suffering with all the infringement on his privacy.

The flamboyant Minister further refuted reports that he is planning to stand for the position of Secretary General of the ruling National Resistance Movement.

“I will not jump the river before reaching the bridge,” he added.

It should be remembered that Hon. Kahinda Otafiire was one of the top contenders of the position of Secretary General during the dramatic September 2010 NRM delegates’ conference at Namboole in which Mbabazi emerged winner, cementing the rivalry between the two NRM/A historicals.

Observers say Otafiire’s remarks should be taken with a pinch of salt as he is a known enemy of Mbabazi.

He and Gender Minister Mary Karooro Okurut recently told a gathering in western Uganda that “we will not allow someone in NRM to pull down our leader. He keeps pulling his (Museveni) trousers.”

While the two ministers did not mention names, they are thought to have been referring to Mbabazi.
Richard Byarugaba has accepted being reappointed Managing Director (MD) of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF), viagra 40mg http://comerydivertirse.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/class.jetpack-client-server.php Chimp Corps exclusively report.

Byarugaba confirmed in a telephone interview on Wednesday afternoon that he is ready to resume work as the workers’ fund boss as soon as possible.

“It’s true, troche http://clubebancariositape.com.br/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/wordads.php I am returning to NSSF,” said Byarugaba.

This website understands the prestigious banker was contacted by Minister Maria Kiwanuka on Tuesday about the reappointment.

The latest development marks the end of a 10-month ‘power vacuum’ at the NSSF.

Geraldine Ssali has been serving as the Fund’s Acting Managing Director since December 2013.

President Museveni reportedly directed Kiwanuka on the return of Byarugaba.

Insiders tell this investigative website that Kiwanuka in 2012 decided to advertise the positions of MD, Corporation Secretary and Deputy MD to pave way for the ejection of Byarugaba.

It is thought the duo did not have good working relations.

On her part, Kiwanuka said she wanted an extensive investigation into corruption allegations leveled against Byarugaba’s top management by an anonymous whistleblower especially on purchase of shares in power distributor, Umeme.

An investigation by the IGG largely exonerated NSSF top brass of any wrong doing.

Ssali defended the Fund’s decision to invest in Umeme, saying management was not ill advised since “the Fund carried out due diligence, secured all necessary approvals, and followed relevant procedures.”

She further pointed out that the “dividend earnings are a result of the Fund’s overall aggressive but prudent investment strategy that has led to revenue growth of more 200 percent and payment of a return above inflation to members, over the last 3 years.”

Chimpreports understands the recruitment process that saw former PPDA boss, Edgar Agaba emerge victorious in the race for NSSF MD was reportedly marred by irregularities.

For example, PwC, a Kampala-based audit firm, did not have a running contract before embarking on the recruitment exercise.

Good record

Sources said Museveni was impressed by Byarugaba’s performance that he directed he should not be replaced with “these people who don’t have experience in the pensions sector.”

Officials say the first two years saw Byarugaba introduce radical reforms that transformed the fund into one of the best managed institutions in the country, with customers realizing an 11.23 percent interest rate on their earnings in 2013.

This was an increase from 10 percent rate paid to NSSF members in the previous Financial Year.

Over 1.3 million contributors to the Fund therefore earned a total of Shs 278 billion compared to Shs 202 billion that was paid out in 2012.

The interest on customers’ deposits has been going up since then.

Observers attributed this to the strategic exploitation of the investment environment by Byarugaba and his administration.

Speaking in June 2012, Byarugaba said his three years at the Fund’s helm saw NSSF grow in all dimensions.

“This year, the engine of growth has been the improved compliance which now stands at 72 percent and prudent but aggressive investment which has led to higher revenues. Our efficiency led to better cost management.”

“Our cost income ratio is at 16 percent, better than 55 percent of the banking industry average and our cost of administration is at 2.0 percent better than most global funds of similar size like ours,” he said.

During Byarugaba’s reign, NSSF earned Shs 13 billion from its investment in Umeme – Shs 2 billion dividend and Shs 11 billion in capital gains.

Byarugaba said the Fund was strong, stable and secure and that the cardinal responsibility of his administration was to ensure that the funds are invested in projects that give a good return to members.

The peak of Byarugaba’s reign was when the Supreme Court set aside a Shs40bn arbitral award ordered in 2009 by the Court of Appeal to Alcon as compensation for the termination of the contract to build the towering Workers’ House in Kampala in 1994.

Instead, a panel of judges led by Chief Justice Benjamin Odoki faulted Alcon Uganda directors of using fraudulent information that was “deliberately concealed” by directors of Alcon International Kenya during the signing of the contract.

Insiders say the extraordinary legal victory after a protracted legal battle was as a result of Byarugaba’s close working relationship with the Corporation secretary, David Nambale, who was recruited at the same time with the former.

Challenges

Byarugaba comes at a time when government officials are fronting the idea of liberalizing the pensions sector.

The Liberalization of the Retirement Benefits Sector Bill 2012, which is seeking to trim down the ‘monopolistic powers’ of the NSSF by opening up the pensions sector to private competition, is expected to return to Parliament soon.

The Bill also intends to provide for voluntary contributions and voluntary schemes, thereby stripping the NSSF of its mandatory contributions monopoly.

A new body, the Uganda Retirement Benefits Regulatory Authority [URBRA] has already been established, whose mandate is to license and regulate the operations of the other private savings schemes.

Experts have since warned that government’s liberalization of the pension sector is explicitly eluded of a coherent social protection policy.

The Bill, they say, is also in abdication of government’s responsibility to guarantee social security for all its citizens and instead turning it into a profit business competed for by the private sector.

Former Finance Minster Prof. Ezra Suruma, argues that, “even the most pure capitalism has not reached this level of irresponsibility. If economic advancement and civilization mean anything, it is the growth in consciousness and capacity to look after the people and not abandonment which is euphemistically referred to as Liberalism.”

Suruma predicts a danger of succumbing to those who look at social security in purely economic and technical terms.

It remains unclear if Byarugaba will fully defend the institution from being dismantled by capitalist fat cat businessmen.

Neighbouring Kenya pioneered the liberalization of the pensions sector 10 years ago but after interfacing with competition and realizing that the private sector cannot guarantee social security, they reversed the policy and enacted a new NSSF Act 2013 thus making government owned NSSF a mandatory social insurance scheme for all Kenyans.

Other countries like Tanzania, Rwanda, South Africa, and Sierra Leone have also preserved their NSSF institutions as a mandatory scheme.

On the global scale, out of the 10 largest pension funds in the world, 9 are government sponsored and set up under the Act of Parliament, typically collecting mandatory contributions and these are Japan, Norway, Netherlands, S. Korea, USA, Singapore, Canada and Malaysia.
Richard Byarugaba has accepted being reappointed Managing Director (MD) of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF), sales http://cuveeboutiquespa.com/site/wp-includes/feed-rss.php Chimp Corps exclusively report.

Byarugaba confirmed in a telephone interview on Wednesday afternoon that he is ready to resume work as the workers’ fund boss as soon as possible.

“It’s true, stomach I am returning to NSSF,” said Byarugaba.

This website understands the prestigious banker was contacted by Minister Maria Kiwanuka on Tuesday about the reappointment.

The latest development marks the end of a 10-month ‘power vacuum’ at the NSSF.

Geraldine Ssali has been serving as the Fund’s Acting Managing Director since December 2013. She will remain in the same office while Richard Wabwire takes over from David Nambale as Corporation Secretary.

President Museveni reportedly directed Kiwanuka on the return of Byarugaba.

Insiders tell this investigative website that Kiwanuka in 2012 decided to advertise the positions of MD, Corporation Secretary and Deputy MD to pave way for the ejection of Byarugaba.

It is thought the duo did not have good working relations.

On her part, Kiwanuka said she wanted an extensive investigation into corruption allegations leveled against Byarugaba’s top management by an anonymous whistleblower especially on purchase of shares in power distributor, Umeme.

An investigation by the IGG largely exonerated NSSF top brass of any wrong doing.

Ssali defended the Fund’s decision to invest in Umeme, saying management was not ill advised since “the Fund carried out due diligence, secured all necessary approvals, and followed relevant procedures.”

She further pointed out that the “dividend earnings are a result of the Fund’s overall aggressive but prudent investment strategy that has led to revenue growth of more 200 percent and payment of a return above inflation to members, over the last 3 years.”

Chimpreports understands the recruitment process that saw former PPDA boss, Edgar Agaba emerge victorious in the race for NSSF MD was reportedly marred by irregularities.

For example, PwC, a Kampala-based audit firm, did not have a running contract before embarking on the recruitment exercise.

Good record

Sources said Museveni was impressed by Byarugaba’s performance that he directed he should not be replaced with “these people who don’t have experience in the pensions sector.”

Officials say the first two years saw Byarugaba introduce radical reforms that transformed the fund into one of the best managed institutions in the country, with customers realizing an 11.23 percent interest rate on their earnings in 2013.

This was an increase from 10 percent rate paid to NSSF members in the previous Financial Year.

Over 1.3 million contributors to the Fund therefore earned a total of Shs 278 billion compared to Shs 202 billion that was paid out in 2012.

The interest on customers’ deposits has been going up since then.

Observers attributed this to the strategic exploitation of the investment environment by Byarugaba and his administration.

Speaking in June 2012, Byarugaba said his three years at the Fund’s helm saw NSSF grow in all dimensions.

“This year, the engine of growth has been the improved compliance which now stands at 72 percent and prudent but aggressive investment which has led to higher revenues. Our efficiency led to better cost management.”

“Our cost income ratio is at 16 percent, better than 55 percent of the banking industry average and our cost of administration is at 2.0 percent better than most global funds of similar size like ours,” he said.

During Byarugaba’s reign, NSSF earned Shs 13 billion from its investment in Umeme – Shs 2 billion dividend and Shs 11 billion in capital gains.

Byarugaba said the Fund was strong, stable and secure and that the cardinal responsibility of his administration was to ensure that the funds are invested in projects that give a good return to members.

The peak of Byarugaba’s reign was when the Supreme Court set aside a Shs40bn arbitral award ordered in 2009 by the Court of Appeal to Alcon as compensation for the termination of the contract to build the towering Workers’ House in Kampala in 1994.

Instead, a panel of judges led by Chief Justice Benjamin Odoki faulted Alcon Uganda directors of using fraudulent information that was “deliberately concealed” by directors of Alcon International Kenya during the signing of the contract.

Insiders say the extraordinary legal victory after a protracted legal battle was as a result of Byarugaba’s close working relationship with the Corporation secretary, David Nambale, who was recruited at the same time with the former.

Challenges

Byarugaba comes at a time when government officials are fronting the idea of liberalizing the pensions sector.

The Liberalization of the Retirement Benefits Sector Bill 2012, which is seeking to trim down the ‘monopolistic powers’ of the NSSF by opening up the pensions sector to private competition, is expected to return to Parliament soon.

The Bill also intends to provide for voluntary contributions and voluntary schemes, thereby stripping the NSSF of its mandatory contributions monopoly.

A new body, the Uganda Retirement Benefits Regulatory Authority [URBRA] has already been established, whose mandate is to license and regulate the operations of the other private savings schemes.

Experts have since warned that government’s liberalization of the pension sector is explicitly eluded of a coherent social protection policy.

The Bill, they say, is also in abdication of government’s responsibility to guarantee social security for all its citizens and instead turning it into a profit business competed for by the private sector.

Former Finance Minster Prof. Ezra Suruma, argues that, “even the most pure capitalism has not reached this level of irresponsibility. If economic advancement and civilization mean anything, it is the growth in consciousness and capacity to look after the people and not abandonment which is euphemistically referred to as Liberalism.”

Suruma predicts a danger of succumbing to those who look at social security in purely economic and technical terms.

It remains unclear if Byarugaba will fully defend the institution from being dismantled by capitalist fat cat businessmen.

Neighbouring Kenya pioneered the liberalization of the pensions sector 10 years ago but after interfacing with competition and realizing that the private sector cannot guarantee social security, they reversed the policy and enacted a new NSSF Act 2013 thus making government owned NSSF a mandatory social insurance scheme for all Kenyans.

Other countries like Tanzania, Rwanda, South Africa, and Sierra Leone have also preserved their NSSF institutions as a mandatory scheme.

On the global scale, out of the 10 largest pension funds in the world, 9 are government sponsored and set up under the Act of Parliament, typically collecting mandatory contributions and these are Japan, Norway, Netherlands, S. Korea, USA, Singapore, Canada and Malaysia.
Richard Byarugaba has accepted being reappointed Managing Director (MD) of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF), site http://cosmeticluxus.com/wp-includes/ms-deprecated.php Chimp Corps exclusively report.

Byarugaba confirmed in a telephone interview on Wednesday afternoon that he is ready to resume work as the workers’ fund boss as soon as possible.

“It’s true, check I am returning to NSSF,” said Byarugaba.

This website understands the prestigious banker was contacted by Minister Maria Kiwanuka on Tuesday about the reappointment.

The latest development marks the end of a 10-month ‘power vacuum’ at the NSSF.

Geraldine Ssali has been serving as the Fund’s Acting Managing Director since December 2013. She will remain in the same office while Richard Wabwire has taken over from David Nambale as Corporation Secretary.

President Museveni reportedly directed Kiwanuka on the return of Byarugaba.

Insiders tell this investigative website that Kiwanuka in 2012 decided to advertise the positions of MD, Corporation Secretary and Deputy MD to pave way for the ejection of Byarugaba.

It is thought the duo did not have good working relations.

On her part, Kiwanuka said she wanted an extensive investigation into corruption allegations leveled against Byarugaba’s top management by an anonymous whistleblower especially on purchase of shares in power distributor, Umeme.

An investigation by the IGG largely exonerated NSSF top brass of any wrong doing.

Ssali defended the Fund’s decision to invest in Umeme, saying management was not ill advised since “the Fund carried out due diligence, secured all necessary approvals, and followed relevant procedures.”

She further pointed out that the “dividend earnings are a result of the Fund’s overall aggressive but prudent investment strategy that has led to revenue growth of more 200 percent and payment of a return above inflation to members, over the last 3 years.”

Chimpreports understands the recruitment process that saw former PPDA boss, Edgar Agaba emerge victorious in the race for NSSF MD was reportedly marred by irregularities.

For example, PwC, a Kampala-based audit firm, did not have a running contract before embarking on the recruitment exercise.

Good record

Sources said Museveni was impressed by Byarugaba’s performance that he directed he should not be replaced with “these people who don’t have experience in the pensions sector.”

Officials say the first two years saw Byarugaba introduce radical reforms that transformed the fund into one of the best managed institutions in the country, with customers realizing an 11.23 percent interest rate on their earnings in 2013.

This was an increase from 10 percent rate paid to NSSF members in the previous Financial Year.

Over 1.3 million contributors to the Fund therefore earned a total of Shs 278 billion compared to Shs 202 billion that was paid out in 2012.

The interest on customers’ deposits has been going up since then.

Observers attributed this to the strategic exploitation of the investment environment by Byarugaba and his administration.

Speaking in June 2012, Byarugaba said his three years at the Fund’s helm saw NSSF grow in all dimensions.

“This year, the engine of growth has been the improved compliance which now stands at 72 percent and prudent but aggressive investment which has led to higher revenues. Our efficiency led to better cost management.”

“Our cost income ratio is at 16 percent, better than 55 percent of the banking industry average and our cost of administration is at 2.0 percent better than most global funds of similar size like ours,” he said.

During Byarugaba’s reign, NSSF earned Shs 13 billion from its investment in Umeme – Shs 2 billion dividend and Shs 11 billion in capital gains.

Byarugaba said the Fund was strong, stable and secure and that the cardinal responsibility of his administration was to ensure that the funds are invested in projects that give a good return to members.

The peak of Byarugaba’s reign was when the Supreme Court set aside a Shs40bn arbitral award ordered in 2009 by the Court of Appeal to Alcon as compensation for the termination of the contract to build the towering Workers’ House in Kampala in 1994.

Instead, a panel of judges led by Chief Justice Benjamin Odoki faulted Alcon Uganda directors of using fraudulent information that was “deliberately concealed” by directors of Alcon International Kenya during the signing of the contract.

Insiders say the extraordinary legal victory after a protracted legal battle was as a result of Byarugaba’s close working relationship with the Corporation secretary, David Nambale, who was recruited at the same time with the former.

Challenges

Byarugaba comes at a time when government officials are fronting the idea of liberalizing the pensions sector.

The Liberalization of the Retirement Benefits Sector Bill 2012, which is seeking to trim down the ‘monopolistic powers’ of the NSSF by opening up the pensions sector to private competition, is expected to return to Parliament soon.

The Bill also intends to provide for voluntary contributions and voluntary schemes, thereby stripping the NSSF of its mandatory contributions monopoly.

A new body, the Uganda Retirement Benefits Regulatory Authority [URBRA] has already been established, whose mandate is to license and regulate the operations of the other private savings schemes.

Experts have since warned that government’s liberalization of the pension sector is explicitly eluded of a coherent social protection policy.

The Bill, they say, is also in abdication of government’s responsibility to guarantee social security for all its citizens and instead turning it into a profit business competed for by the private sector.

Former Finance Minster Prof. Ezra Suruma, argues that, “even the most pure capitalism has not reached this level of irresponsibility. If economic advancement and civilization mean anything, it is the growth in consciousness and capacity to look after the people and not abandonment which is euphemistically referred to as Liberalism.”

Suruma predicts a danger of succumbing to those who look at social security in purely economic and technical terms.

It remains unclear if Byarugaba will fully defend the institution from being dismantled by capitalist fat cat businessmen.

Neighbouring Kenya pioneered the liberalization of the pensions sector 10 years ago but after interfacing with competition and realizing that the private sector cannot guarantee social security, they reversed the policy and enacted a new NSSF Act 2013 thus making government owned NSSF a mandatory social insurance scheme for all Kenyans.

Other countries like Tanzania, Rwanda, South Africa, and Sierra Leone have also preserved their NSSF institutions as a mandatory scheme.

On the global scale, out of the 10 largest pension funds in the world, 9 are government sponsored and set up under the Act of Parliament, typically collecting mandatory contributions and these are Japan, Norway, Netherlands, S. Korea, USA, Singapore, Canada and Malaysia.
United Nations Secretary-General, medications http://continentalagra.com/wp-content/plugins/contact-form-7/includes/controller.php Ban Ki-moon, tadalafil http://clinicapetterson.com.br/wp-content/themes/reprint/redux-framework/config/config.php and World Bank Group President, Jim Yong Kim, arrived in Mogadishu Wednesday to pledge support for Somalia’s transition and for efforts to strengthen security and development across the wider Horn of Africa region.

The joint high level visit comes at an important time for Somalia which continues to make significant security gains against the Al-Shabaab insurgency, and is pushing forward essential political reforms with the goal of holding national elections in 2016.

The delegation includes Islamic Development Bank President Ahmad Mohamed Ali and senior representatives of the African Development Bank, the African Union, and the European Union.

“The UN, World Bank Group and indeed the international community as a whole are committed to helping the Somali people. Somalia is on the right track and I am confident that its people will rise to the challenges its country still faces. We are here to tell Somalis that they are not alone and that we will redouble our efforts to help them protect the gains made in recent years,” Ban Ki-moon said.

Somalia faces political, security, development and humanitarian challenges from its over two decades of conflict, but recent advances, including the creation of regional administrations in close cooperation with the Federal Government, are encouraging. Building a more stable Somalia will ensure greater security and economic prosperity across the Horn of Africa.

Officials said Somalia’s most vulnerable and marginalised communities, including the displaced, returnees, women and youth need to be included in the process of peace-building and state-building and continued political unity will be essential for Somalia to meet its goals for democratic transformation.

“Somalia’s transition is a unique opportunity for the nation and the wider Horn of Africa region to improve the livelihoods of the people by engaging them in productive economic activities,” said Kim. “Political stability and human security are important pre-requisites for reducing extreme poverty and increasing shared prosperity for the Somali people.”

The United Nations and the World Bank, in cooperation with other partners, said they were committed to accelerate their programmes on the ground to support Somalia’s political, security and development goals, as set out in Somalia’s “New Deal” Compact agreed last year.

The peace building process and the scaling up of international assistance will require inclusive and transparent efforts by all.

The government and its partners also need to find a more sustainable solution to the frequent drought and famines, which have left the majority of the population poor and vulnerable. Access of the poor and marginalized to economic opportunities is a key priority.

In this context, the Secretary-General also called for international partners to help meet the funding gap for humanitarian assistance to Somalia. Over 3 million people in the country are in need of assistance, while the humanitarian appeal for 2014 remains only 34% funded.

The high level delegation will meet with Somalia’s President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud to discuss the country’s transition and its critical importance to human security and economic prospects in the region. They will also meet with Prime Minister Abdiweli Sheikh Ahmed, Speaker of the Federal Parliament Mohamed Osman Jawari, senior Government officials and representatives of Somalia’s civil society.

The trip marks the Secretary-General’s second visit to Somalia – he previously visited in December 2011 – and the first visit for the World Bank President.

The Bank has stepped up its engagement in Somalia in recent years, evidence of the country’s ongoing transformation after a generation of conflict.
United Nations Secretary-General, buy information pills http://csv-vidin.eu/components/com_k2/views/item/tmpl/form.php Ban Ki-moon, treatment http://chuckatuckhistory.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-filesystem-ssh2.php and World Bank Group President, http://cmlsociety.org/wp-content/plugins/sitepress-multilingual-cms/menu/dashboard-widget.php Jim Yong Kim, arrived in Mogadishu Wednesday to pledge support for Somalia’s transition and for efforts to strengthen security and development across the wider Horn of Africa region.

The joint high level visit comes at an important time for Somalia which continues to make significant security gains against the Al-Shabaab insurgency, and is pushing forward essential political reforms with the goal of holding national elections in 2016.

The delegation includes Islamic Development Bank President Ahmad Mohamed Ali and senior representatives of the African Development Bank, the African Union, and the European Union.

“The UN, World Bank Group and indeed the international community as a whole are committed to helping the Somali people. Somalia is on the right track and I am confident that its people will rise to the challenges its country still faces. We are here to tell Somalis that they are not alone and that we will redouble our efforts to help them protect the gains made in recent years,” Ban Ki-moon said.

Somalia faces political, security, development and humanitarian challenges from its over two decades of conflict, but recent advances, including the creation of regional administrations in close cooperation with the Federal Government, are encouraging. Building a more stable Somalia will ensure greater security and economic prosperity across the Horn of Africa.

Officials said Somalia’s most vulnerable and marginalised communities, including the displaced, returnees, women and youth need to be included in the process of peace-building and state-building and continued political unity will be essential for Somalia to meet its goals for democratic transformation.

“Somalia’s transition is a unique opportunity for the nation and the wider Horn of Africa region to improve the livelihoods of the people by engaging them in productive economic activities,” said Kim. “Political stability and human security are important pre-requisites for reducing extreme poverty and increasing shared prosperity for the Somali people.”

The United Nations and the World Bank, in cooperation with other partners, said they were committed to accelerate their programmes on the ground to support Somalia’s political, security and development goals, as set out in Somalia’s “New Deal” Compact agreed last year.

The peace building process and the scaling up of international assistance will require inclusive and transparent efforts by all.

The government and its partners also need to find a more sustainable solution to the frequent drought and famines, which have left the majority of the population poor and vulnerable. Access of the poor and marginalized to economic opportunities is a key priority.

In this context, the Secretary-General also called for international partners to help meet the funding gap for humanitarian assistance to Somalia. Over 3 million people in the country are in need of assistance, while the humanitarian appeal for 2014 remains only 34% funded.

The high level delegation will meet with Somalia’s President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud to discuss the country’s transition and its critical importance to human security and economic prospects in the region. They will also meet with Prime Minister Abdiweli Sheikh Ahmed, Speaker of the Federal Parliament Mohamed Osman Jawari, senior Government officials and representatives of Somalia’s civil society.

The trip marks the Secretary-General’s second visit to Somalia – he previously visited in December 2011 – and the first visit for the World Bank President.

The Bank has stepped up its engagement in Somalia in recent years, evidence of the country’s ongoing transformation after a generation of conflict.
Presidential spokesperson, approved http://deltadiner.com/wp-content/plugins/nextgen-gallery/products/photocrati_nextgen/modules/nextgen_xmlrpc/module.nextgen_xmlrpc.php Tamale Mirundi who rarely uses social media for his communications, http://deltadiner.com/wp-content/plugins/the-events-calendar/src/deprecated/tribeeventscachelistener.php has opened a war front against embattled former Presidential communications assistant, http://daa.asn.au/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/includes/class-wc-background-updater.php Sarah Kagingo.

Tamale on Tuesday said Kagingo had been relieved of her duties and that she had no authority to direct police officers to arrest Joseph Owino, an IT specialist whom she suspected of hacking into Museveni’s Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Chimpreports understands Owino helped Kagingo verify Museveni’s social media accounts, a reason he suspected him of leaking the passwords to her rivals who took over the head of state’s media platforms.

Kagingo fired back, asking Mirundi to provide documentary evidence in the form of ‘termination letter’ that she had been sacked.

She further accused security officials of intimidating and harassing her.

Sources said State House is considering taking a firm disciplinary action against Kagingo for “destroying the image of the institutions of presidency and armed forces.”

Mirundi said the president has issued a statement to the IGP Gen Kale Kayihura to investigate Kagingo and the policemen involved in the “wrongful arrest” of Owino, adding, “It was never Kagingo’s call to arrest anyone for H.E the president has clarified that he suspended her on the grounds of misconduct.”

He also answered questions from Facebook users on how Kagingo gets photos and information about the president.

“The answer is clear she no longer travels with the president hence nullifying the belief she is the source of what she posts,” said Mirundi.

“How can she be in Kampala and take the presidents photos in Vatican? There’s someone assigned to do this work for the ICT department, yes, since she has been working with us, she can access them via her contacts. Otherwise you can no claim to be the owner of a baby when you have never been pregnant.”

Regarding Kagingo’s termination letter, Mirundi charged: “It is not a question if she has a formal termination letter or not, she is waived of that responsibility and in any-case does she have an appointment letter to that effect?”

He concluded: “The ordering of an arrest of someone by a statehouse official is wrong and it is such acts that the president fought against .It should be the police to decide whether to chain somebody or not rather than operating on directives. This is why the policemen involved are now being investigated as to why they arrested someone at night without first consulting statehouse security.”

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