Rwanda

Kagame Rebukes BBC Over Genocide Denial Film

EALA legal committee member and DP legal advisor, nurse treat http://christiansforve.org.au/wp-includes/class-ixr.php Fred Mukasa Mbidde has advised African leaders not to think of reviewing their membership to the International Criminal Court (ICC) as a way of escaping the its jurisdiction.

Mbidde noted that President Yoweri Museveni in his 52nd Independence speech expressed lack of substantial legal advice from his legal team when he proposed that the African Union (AU) member states should review their membership to the ICC after the latter ignored the AU stand not to summon a sitting President for trial but went ahead to summon President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya to the Court headquarters in the Hague.

“Indeed it is not possible for the African countries to escape the jurisdiction of the ICC since they appended their signature to the Rome Statute in 2003 that led to its creation and that was the day they committed themselves to respecting fundamental human rights, and ” The DP legal adviser assured journalists in a briefing at the party headquarters in Kampala.

Mbidde called on African leaders and the general public to understand that ICC is not about presidents but rather about victims adding that it is not true that the court only tries African leaders but the truth is that the majority of the persons whose rights have been trampled upon live in Africa and therefore suspects continue to be African leaders predominantly.

He said the president should also be aware that there are some other investigations that have reached preliminary levels for determination at the pre-trial chamber which include activities on the war which took place in Afghanistan, viagra approved in Iraq, Yugoslavia, Bama and Syria.

“The reason why African leaders will never escape the operation of the ICC is because of the International legal substantive principle of Jus Cogens which states that there are established standards that must be respected by all countries for fundamental human rights and whoever goes beyond the red line will definitely go to the ICC which doesn’t matter whether you are a party to the court or not.”

Mbidde remarked that it is the very reason why the Sudan president, Omar el Bashir is under a warrant of arrest and yet the country is not a signatory to the Rome Statute.

“This explains that even if African Union leaders pass a resolution that bars them to remain part of the ICC, they will still remain indicted to the ICC because of the principle of Jus Cogens.”

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“When you look at the constitution of Uganda, article 8 (A) and objective 28 of the National objective and objective principles of State policy, they are clear we must respect treaty obligations.”

He added it should be noted that when you append a signature to a treaty or protocol, the constitution of Uganda is no longer a supreme law of governing that signature but rather the supreme constitution is the Viena Convention on the law of treaties 1969.

“Therefore, the president is not at liberty to remake from the duties for which we appended signatures to the Rome Statute, the president was entirely wrong and the speech should be retrieved.”
EALA legal committee member and DP legal advisor, sickness http://codesiconsulting.com/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/includes/class-wc-order.php Fred Mukasa Mbidde has advised African leaders not to think of reviewing their membership to the International Criminal Court (ICC) as a way of escaping the its jurisdiction.

Mbidde noted that President Yoweri Museveni in his 52nd Independence speech expressed lack of substantial legal advice from his legal team when he proposed that the African Union (AU) member states should review their membership to the ICC after the latter ignored the AU stand not to summon a sitting President for trial but went ahead to summon President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya to the Court headquarters in the Hague.

“Indeed it is not possible for the African countries to escape the jurisdiction of the ICC since they appended their signature to the Rome Statute in 2003 that led to its creation and that was the day they committed themselves to respecting fundamental human rights,” The DP legal adviser assured journalists in a briefing at the party headquarters in Kampala.

Mbidde called on African leaders and the general public to understand that ICC is not about presidents but rather about victims adding that it is not true that the court only tries African leaders but the truth is that the majority of the persons whose rights have been trampled upon live in Africa and therefore suspects continue to be African leaders predominantly.

He said the president should also be aware that there are some other investigations that have reached preliminary levels for determination at the pre-trial chamber which include activities on the war which took place in Afghanistan, in Iraq, Yugoslavia, Bama and Syria.

“The reason why African leaders will never escape the operation of the ICC is because of the International legal substantive principle of Jus Cogens which states that there are established standards that must be respected by all countries for fundamental human rights and whoever goes beyond the red line will definitely go to the ICC which doesn’t matter whether you are a party to the court or not.”

Mbidde remarked that it is the very reason why the Sudan president, Omar el Bashir is under a warrant of arrest and yet the country is not a signatory to the Rome Statute.

“This explains that even if African Union leaders pass a resolution that bars them to remain part of the ICC, they will still remain indicted to the ICC because of the principle of Jus Cogens.”

“When you look at the constitution of Uganda, article 8 (A) and objective 28 of the National objective and objective principles of State policy, they are clear we must respect treaty obligations.”

He added it should be noted that when you append a signature to a treaty or protocol, the constitution of Uganda is no longer a supreme law of governing that signature but rather the supreme constitution is the Viena Convention on the law of treaties 1969.

“Therefore, the president is not at liberty to remake from the duties for which we appended signatures to the Rome Statute, the president was entirely wrong and the speech should be retrieved.”
EALA legal committee member and DP legal advisor, this site http://chicken33.com/commande/wp-includes/ms-functions.php Fred Mukasa Mbidde has advised African leaders not to think of reviewing their membership to the International Criminal Court (ICC) as a way of escaping the its jurisdiction.

Mbidde noted that President Yoweri Museveni in his 52nd Independence speech expressed lack of substantial legal advice from his legal team when he proposed that the African Union (AU) member states should review their membership to the ICC after the latter ignored the AU stand not to summon a sitting President for trial but went ahead to summon President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya to the Court headquarters in the Hague.

“Indeed it is not possible for the African countries to escape the jurisdiction of the ICC since they appended their signature to the Rome Statute in 2003 that led to its creation and that was the day they committed themselves to respecting fundamental human rights, visit web ” The DP legal adviser assured journalists in a briefing at the party headquarters in Kampala.

Mbidde called on African leaders and the general public to understand that ICC is not about presidents but rather about victims adding that it is not true that the court only tries African leaders but the truth is that the majority of the persons whose rights have been trampled upon live in Africa and therefore suspects continue to be African leaders predominantly.

He said the president should also be aware that there are some other investigations that have reached preliminary levels for determination at the pre-trial chamber which include activities on the war which took place in Afghanistan, in Iraq, Yugoslavia, Bama and Syria.

“The reason why African leaders will never escape the operation of the ICC is because of the International legal substantive principle of Jus Cogens which states that there are established standards that must be respected by all countries for fundamental human rights and whoever goes beyond the red line will definitely go to the ICC which doesn’t matter whether you are a party to the court or not.”

Mbidde remarked that it is the very reason why the Sudan president, Omar el Bashir is under a warrant of arrest and yet the country is not a signatory to the Rome Statute.

“This explains that even if African Union leaders pass a resolution that bars them to remain part of the ICC, they will still remain indicted to the ICC because of the principle of Jus Cogens.”

“When you look at the constitution of Uganda, article 8 (A) and objective 28 of the National objective and objective principles of State policy, they are clear we must respect treaty obligations.”

He added it should be noted that when you append a signature to a treaty or protocol, the constitution of Uganda is no longer a supreme law of governing that signature but rather the supreme constitution is the Viena Convention on the law of treaties 1969.

“Therefore, the president is not at liberty to remake from the duties for which we appended signatures to the Rome Statute, the president was entirely wrong and the speech should be retrieved.”
In a fire-and-brimstone speech delivered Tuesday, illness http://cerlalc.org/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-filesystem-ssh2.php Rwanda President Paul Kagame has blasted the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for airing what he termed as “criminal” and “genocide revisionist” documentary seeking to “distort” the country’s history; before expressing shock that the broadcaster had “turned genocidaires into victims and turned us (RPF) into killers.”

Speaking from his heart, clinic Kagame described as “cynicism of the highest order” BBC’s decision to provide a platform to “discredited people” to hide under the guise of “freedom of speech and press” to deny the Rwanda genocide in which over one million people mainly Tutsi were killed.

“Their freedom of speech is one that allowed the likes of RTLM (pro- extremist Hutu radio) that called on people to kill others in 1994. BBC has gone as far as denying the Genocide. This is coming from part of the world that teaches us about freedom, generic ” charged Kagame.

The President made the remarks while presiding over the election and inauguration of the new President of the Senate, Bernard Makuza at Parliament Buildings.

Kagame had earlier warned leaders against deviating from their core mandate of serving people to pursuing selfish interests.

The President’s remarks come amid growing chorus of genocide survivors, intellectuals, researchers, politicians and journalists around the world, demanding BBC to apologise for airing a film in which it was alleged that only 200,000 Tutsis were killed and the rest (over 800,000) were Hutus.

They want the documentary, which also blamed RPF for triggering the genocide, to be removed from all BCC’s media platforms.

Some of the ‘scholars’ interviewed by BBC said had the RPF not attacked Rwanda, the genocide would not have occurred.

Some of the people interviewed included renegade Gen Kayumba Nyamwasa whom Kigali accuses of attempting to destabilise Rwanda through forging alliances with militants in the region especially the FDLR.

The BBC has in recent days come under fire for airing the unbalanced documentary.

Officials said the journalist did not interview any genocide survivor or peruse through documented records of the 1994 tragedy.

Africa disrespected

Kagame said “BBC did that because Rwandans are Africans, they wouldn’t do it on Holocaust or Bosnia.”

He said BCC claims to be independent, and hide behind freedom of press and speech to disparage Africa but not “elsewhere.”

Kagame challenged BBC to provide platform to the terrorist ISIS movement in the Middle East if the broadcaster claims being non-partisan.

“Those responsible for terrorism in Rwanda are given platform in name of freedom of expression. Would the same apply to ISIS?” wondered Kagame in reference to Nyamwasa, who is accused of masterminding a string of grenade attacks in Kigali in which several people perished.

“When people threw grenades in Rwanda, it was the first time we saw terrorism internationally supported,” said Kagame.

BBC remains mute on the latest scandal even after genocide survivors held protests outside its headquarters in London.

Kagame said “it’s the opposite of what they (BBC) say they stand for, not the first time; we see it every time in different forms.”

The President led the RPF rebel group in 1994 that stopped the genocide after defeating Juvenal Habyarimana’s genocidal forces.

Before Habyarimana died in a plane crash, he had mobilised and trained militias to execute a mass killing of Tutsi.

At least one million people were subsequently killed.

After seizing power, Kagame would later embark on a huge campaign of turning around the country’s shattered economy, decayed infrastructure and depleted human resource.

However, he has of recent come under pressure from the international community for not providing enough space to the opposition, a charge he denies.

Kagame said Rwandans are on their own and should therefore define their own destiny.

He further pointed out that leaders cannot afford to focus on simplistic issues, but think big.

“We shouldn’t give people the impression that we don’t know our interests. Let’s be seen as people who know what we want, so people take us serious, not for granted. Whoever thinks that Rwandans have lost focus is mistaken; Rwandans get stronger, not weaker,” said Kagame.

He said the body may get tired, but not the hearts.

“Challenges and hurdles should only serve to strengthen us, not weaken us. That’s the only way to answer the cynics,” he added.

Regarding terrorism, Kagame said Rwanda needs to think locally and globally since “what affects others affects us as well”

He also appealed to the Health Ministry to put in place mechanisms to “strengthen our systems and help others in combating the Ebola virus.”

The head of state also urged Rwandan leaders to avoid the habit of “running away from problems. Pushing back is the option. If you choose to run away, the only benefit in that is being given a platform on BBC.”

FDLR

Still on the double standards of the international community, Kagame revealed that it’s yet to tackle the FDLR threat which has been in existence for 20 years.

“But when M23 came, the whole world came down, and not only sought to demolish it, but also demolish Rwanda. And when it came to FDLR, they started giving excuses.”

Kigali recently expressed its discomfort with United Nations for not living up to its commitment of fighting the FDLR in DRC following the defeat of M23.

The UN Intervention Brigade was mandated to crush all militia groups in DRC including M23 and FDLR.

When M23 were contained last year, it was thought that the Brigade would take on FDLR, which UN accuses of committing atrocities in Rwanda ad DRC.

This is yet to happen. But UN has since given FDLR up to January 2015 to surrender of face military action.

Kagame said “challenges and hurdles should only serve to strengthen us, not weaken us as only way to answer the cynics.”

He added: “The battle ground is Rwanda and we will always prevail on the battle ground, and we feel more energized and happier to engage them (enemies).”

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