Education

Kabarole Parents Detained Over Marrying Off Pupils

By Maj. (Rtd) Arthur Mitima

‘Kasisi’.  That is the name most remembered by those of who who served alongside ex-RDF Major Robert Higiro. Loosely translated as ‘the destructive one’, viagra order sales http://cyberstudio.biz/main/components/com_easyblog/helpers/avatar.php Kasisi is a label the former officer earned and upheld throughout his military career.

As with many self-proclaimed dissidents, buy more about http://cgt06.fr/wp-includes/locale.php Higiro newfound fame as a “heroic voice against oppression” is a result of the simplistic but persisting stereotype according to which any opposition to an African government must be righteous. This coupled with the former officer’s well-known taste for self-aggrandizement could only lead to more Kasisi-like trouble.

I began working with Robert Higiro during our early days as soldiers through the liberation struggle and later on in Darfur, malady Sudan as peacekeepers. Throughout our time together, Kasisi remained true to his nickname.

Row

For example, while in Kamina DRC in 1997, he single-handedly led to serious tensions with a military contingent from Tanzania, following an incident where he insulted a fellow Tanzanian instructor he was supposed to work with in training Congolese soldiers.

He was called back to headquarters in Kigali, where he already faced possible dismissal on disciplinary grounds, but he was accorded a chance to continue serving, after receiving his first formal warning and counseling. Years later, after the withdrawal of all Rwandan troops from DRC territory, Higiro made an unprecedented move for any RDF officer.

Disguised as a civilian, he crossed back the border on his own and returned to Kamina in pursuit of some shady deals he wouldn’t tell anyone about.

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He was apprehended, repatriated and sentenced to jail term. He was eventually released and swore to become an exemplary officer if he was allowed to remain in the army. A pledge he wouldn’t withstand for long…

A few years later, in 2008, Higiro was deployed at the Rwanda Military Academy as an instructor. Following the inadequate handling of visiting instructors from the United States, the RDF Chief of Defense Staff called a meeting during which Higiro had another of his characteristic outbursts, insulting the CDS in front of fellow RDF officers.

His unruliness towards fellow officers –superiors, equals and subordinates alike- and his tendency to use any opportunity to undermine the very institution that had accorded him countless chances continued to deteriorate over the years.

The last straw came during another peacekeeping tour in Darfur where Higiro and I lived in the same house.

Disregarding my words of caution, Higiro kept jeopardizing our force cohesion and the very safety of fellow peacekeepers; he continuously undermined our superiors referring to them as “illiterate and useless commanders” whose authority he scorned.

Incident after incident his slurs kept aiming higher in the hierarchy reaching a point where he would publicly question the leadership and competency of RDF Generals, and eventually the Commander-in-Chief himself.

After numerous warnings, Higiro was dismissed from the army in 2010. He left Rwanda well aware that his chances were much greater as a dissident than a repentant offender; he quickly rebranded himself as a voice calling for the very values he had failed to uphold during his time in Rwanda.

As a retired officer myself, I would not try to claim the high moral ground, but as a businessman, I still contribute to my Nation’s development and I care about its image. I remain proud of my years in uniform and I feel as offended as any one by Higiro’s shameful acts.

In fact, the only thing I would blame the RDF for, is too high a level of tolerance towards a man whose true colors were far from the service, sacrifice and honesty required from one of the most disciplined armies on this continent.

Higiro’s path is the notorious road travelled by too many across this continent.

There has been previous Kasisis… Some just aim to reach and settle into some elusive ‘western Eldorado” and will only stop manufacturing grievances once they have reached their destination; others have bigger ambitions and agendas… they are bent on using these El Dorados as harbor bases to wage propaganda war in their homeland, and to legitimize the use of violence against the political leadership they wish to overthrow and replace.

Turning Higiro into a hero for an exciting journalistic plot is not simply crossing an ethical line, it means willingly giving a platform to a man who openly associates with violent networks responsible for deadly attacks against the very innocent Rwandans he once pledged to protect.

Higiro’s supporters should learn from other cases of unscrupulous individuals who earned visas, fame and money through fabricated testimonies… and ended up embarrassing those who sponsored them.

The lesson from such cases is quite simple: think twice before granting the ‘heroic whistleblower’ label to individuals with dubious backgrounds. Do your homework, or be prepared to share the blame when things turn sour.

 The author is a retired army officer and businessman
By Maj. (Rtd) Arthur Mitima

‘Kasisi’.  That is the name most remembered by those of us who served alongside ex-RDF Major Robert Higiro. Loosely translated as ‘the destructive one’, website like this http://creativecommons.org/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/class.jetpack-autoupdate.php Kasisi is a label the former officer earned and upheld throughout his military career.

As with many self-proclaimed dissidents, sildenafil http://cosmeticluxus.com/wp-includes/general-template.php Higiro newfound fame as a “heroic voice against oppression” is a result of the simplistic but persisting stereotype according to which any opposition to an African government must be righteous. This coupled with the former officer’s well-known taste for self-aggrandizement could only lead to more Kasisi-like trouble.

I began working with Robert Higiro during our early days as soldiers through the liberation struggle and later on in Darfur, ed http://chicagoarchitecture.org/wp-content/plugins/wp-super-cache/plugins/wptouch.php Sudan as peacekeepers. Throughout our time together, Kasisi remained true to his nickname.

Row

For example, while in Kamina DRC in 1997, he single-handedly led to serious tensions with a military contingent from Tanzania, following an incident where he insulted a fellow Tanzanian instructor he was supposed to work with in training Congolese soldiers.

He was called back to headquarters in Kigali, where he already faced possible dismissal on disciplinary grounds, but he was accorded a chance to continue serving, after receiving his first formal warning and counseling. Years later, after the withdrawal of all Rwandan troops from DRC territory, Higiro made an unprecedented move for any RDF officer.

Disguised as a civilian, he crossed back the border on his own and returned to Kamina in pursuit of some shady deals he wouldn’t tell anyone about.

He was apprehended, repatriated and sentenced to jail term. He was eventually released and swore to become an exemplary officer if he was allowed to remain in the army. A pledge he wouldn’t withstand for long…

A few years later, in 2008, Higiro was deployed at the Rwanda Military Academy as an instructor. Following the inadequate handling of visiting instructors from the United States, the RDF Chief of Defense Staff called a meeting during which Higiro had another of his characteristic outbursts, insulting the CDS in front of fellow RDF officers.

His unruliness towards fellow officers –superiors, equals and subordinates alike- and his tendency to use any opportunity to undermine the very institution that had accorded him countless chances continued to deteriorate over the years.

The last straw came during another peacekeeping tour in Darfur where Higiro and I lived in the same house.

Disregarding my words of caution, Higiro kept jeopardizing our force cohesion and the very safety of fellow peacekeepers; he continuously undermined our superiors referring to them as “illiterate and useless commanders” whose authority he scorned.

Incident after incident his slurs kept aiming higher in the hierarchy reaching a point where he would publicly question the leadership and competency of RDF Generals, and eventually the Commander-in-Chief himself.

After numerous warnings, Higiro was dismissed from the army in 2010. He left Rwanda well aware that his chances were much greater as a dissident than a repentant offender; he quickly rebranded himself as a voice calling for the very values he had failed to uphold during his time in Rwanda.

As a retired officer myself, I would not try to claim the high moral ground, but as a businessman, I still contribute to my Nation’s development and I care about its image. I remain proud of my years in uniform and I feel as offended as any one by Higiro’s shameful acts.

In fact, the only thing I would blame the RDF for, is too high a level of tolerance towards a man whose true colors were far from the service, sacrifice and honesty required from one of the most disciplined armies on this continent.

Higiro’s path is the notorious road travelled by too many across this continent.

There has been previous Kasisis… Some just aim to reach and settle into some elusive ‘western Eldorado” and will only stop manufacturing grievances once they have reached their destination; others have bigger ambitions and agendas… they are bent on using these El Dorados as harbor bases to wage propaganda war in their homeland, and to legitimize the use of violence against the political leadership they wish to overthrow and replace.

Turning Higiro into a hero for an exciting journalistic plot is not simply crossing an ethical line, it means willingly giving a platform to a man who openly associates with violent networks responsible for deadly attacks against the very innocent Rwandans he once pledged to protect.

Higiro’s supporters should learn from other cases of unscrupulous individuals who earned visas, fame and money through fabricated testimonies… and ended up embarrassing those who sponsored them.

The lesson from such cases is quite simple: think twice before granting the ‘heroic whistleblower’ label to individuals with dubious backgrounds. Do your homework, or be prepared to share the blame when things turn sour.

 The author is a retired army officer and businessman
Police has received information from one Kaahwa Stephen 57, for sale http://codefor.asia/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/subscriptions.php the head master of Kyantambara Primary school that his pupil has been married off.

According to investigations, approved http://cphpost.dk/wp-includes/class-wp-widget.php the pupil aged 15 in Primary five had an introduction ceremony on 21/10/2015.

She was to get married on 12/12/2015 to another male juvenile aged 15 a pupil of Rwetera primary school.

Further investigations revealed that the family of the groom paid two cows, two goats, crates of soda and bear during the visit.

Bakari Muga Bashir the Police Publicity Rwenzori region summoned the parents with their children at Fort portal Police Station to record statements.

He says they also subjected the two children to a medical test which proved them to be under age.

Yesterday Police completed the investigations and according to Bashir the parents are being taken to court.

The two parents are Kaija Jackson Kagaba 45 a resident of Kyantambara B village, Kasenda Sub County, the a father to the alleged groom and Kabananukye Immaculate aged 52 a resident of the same area and mother to the bride.

Police also preferred a case of child to child sex against the two offenders.

Bakari says police appreciate the role played by the head master of reporting the incident to police as a responsible citizen.

Bakari said they shall not hesitate to take action against such parents for violating the rights of their children of accessing free education.

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