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How to Get Youth Involved in Agriculture

The state has finalized its submission in the petition filed by nine gay activists in the constitutional court challenging the enactment of the Anti Homosexuality Act that was passed by Parliament last year.
State Attorney, this web http://colourtherapy.com.au/wp-admin/includes/class-walker-nav-menu-checklist.php Patricia Muteesi in the State’s submission cited that the petitioners did not adduce any evidence to prove that the Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga did not ascertain whether there was quorum or not before the vote on the law.
Mutesi contended that quorum is a factual issue which cannot be proven by just mere statements and allegations as submitted in by petitioners but it should be based on real evidence.
It is on this note that she advised the petitioners at least to submit a video footage, eye count evidence or a registry to prove their statements that the quorum was not in parliament when this law was passed.
Muteesi further argued that the petitioners did not argue the case they pleaded of the law being inconsistent with the constitution but instead pleaded that the Speaker’s action were inconsistent with the constitution when she contravened article 23 of the rules of procedure that requires a third of the honorable members before passing any act.
It is on this note that Patricia prayed that the constitutional court dismisses the petition.

 

Nine gay activists through their lawyers Rendsilas Rwakafuzi and Caleb Alaka petitioned the constitutional court, seeking to overturn the antigay bill that was recently signed into law by President Museveni, faulting the Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga for contravening the parliamentary rules of procedure.

 

Constitutional Court judges will deliver their ruling on this matter tomorrow.

The state has finalized its submission in the petition filed by nine gay activists in the constitutional court challenging the enactment of the Anti Homosexuality Act that was passed by Parliament last year.

State Attorney, viagra 60mg http://copiproperties.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-site-settings-endpoint.php Patricia Muteesi in the State’s submission cited that the petitioners did not adduce any evidence to prove that the Speaker of Parliament, prostate http://chat.novaintermed.ro/wp-includes/comment.php Rebecca Kadaga did not ascertain whether there was quorum or not before the vote on the law.

Mutesi contended that quorum is a factual issue which cannot be proven by just mere statements and allegations as submitted in by petitioners but it should be based on real evidence.

It is on this note that she advised the petitioners at least to submit a video footage, http://clubcycloautun.fr/wp-includes/class-ixr.php eye count evidence or a registry to prove their statements that the quorum was not in parliament when this law was passed.

Muteesi further argued that the petitioners did not argue the case they pleaded of the law being inconsistent with the constitution but instead pleaded that the Speaker’s action were inconsistent with the constitution when she contravened article 23 of the rules of procedure that requires a third of the honorable members before passing any act.

It is on this note that Patricia prayed that the constitutional court dismisses the petition.

Nine gay activists through their lawyers Rendsilas Rwakafuzi and Caleb Alaka petitioned the constitutional court, seeking to overturn the antigay bill that was recently signed into law by President Museveni, faulting the Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga for contravening the parliamentary rules of procedure.

Constitutional Court judges will deliver their ruling on this matter tomorrow.

The state has finalized its submission in the petition filed by nine gay activists in the Constitutional Court, information pills http://cloud.ca/wp-admin/includes/theme.php challenging the enactment of the Anti Homosexuality Act that was passed by Parliament last year.

State Attorney, online http://crystalhills.org/crystalhills.org/templates/yoo_infinite/warp/config/layouts/fields/text.php Patricia Mutesi said petitioners did not adduce any evidence to prove that the Speaker of Parliament, buy information pills http://cirgroup.com/typo3conf/ext/date2cal/src/class.tx_date2cal_befunc.php Rebecca Kadaga did not ascertain whether there was quorum or not before the vote on the law.

The activists had alleged that the law was passed with inadequate forum in Parliament and that Speaker Rebecca Kadaga ignored Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi’s advice before voting on the Bill.

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Mutesi contended that quorum is a factual issue which cannot be proven by just mere statements and allegations as submitted by petitioners “but it should be based on real evidence.”

It is on this note that she advised the petitioners to submit a video footage, eye count evidence or a registry to prove their statements that the quorum was not adequate when this law was passed.

Mutesi further argued that the petitioners did not argue the case they pleaded of the law being inconsistent with the constitution but instead pleaded that the Speaker’s action was inconsistent with the constitution when she contravened Article 23 of the rules of procedure that requires a third of the honourable members before passing any act.

It is on this note that Mutesi prayed that the Constitutional Court dismisses the petition.

Nine gay activists through their lawyers Ladislaus Rwakafuzi and Caleb Alaka petitioned the Constitutional Court, seeking to overturn the anti-homosexuality law.

Constitutional Court judges will deliver their ruling on this matter tomorrow.

Parliament recently passed the controversial Anti-Homosexuality Bill, criminalizing, outlawing and providing harsh jail terms for same sex relationships in the country.

The Anti-Homosexuality Bill, 2009, a Private Members’ Bill, was first presented to Parliament by Hon. David Bahati (NRM, Ndorwa West) in October 2009. It was one of the pending bills not considered at the end of the 8th Parliament, but saved and re-introduced for consideration by the 9th Parliament.

Lawmakers say the law seeks to establish a comprehensive consolidated legislation to protect the traditional family by prohibiting any form of sexual relations between persons of the same sex; and the promotion or recognition of such sexual relations in public institutions and other places through or with the support of any government entity in Uganda or any other nongovernmental organization inside or outside the country.

The Committee on Legal and Parliamentary Affairs said in its Report, “The law aims at strengthening the nation’s capacity to deal with emerging internal and external threats to the traditional heterosexual family.”

The Committee also said that there is need to protect the children and youth of Uganda who are vulnerable to sexual abuse and deviations as a result of cultural changes, uncensored information technologies, parentless child development settings and increasing attempts by homosexuals to raise children in homosexual relationships through adoption and foster care.

The Anti Homosexuality Bill provides a fourteen year jail term for one convicted for the offence of homosexuality; and imprisonment for life for the offence of aggravated homosexuality.

A huge rally was held at Kololo ceremonial grounds in Kampala to thank President Museveni for resisting western pressure to sign the Bill in to law.
The state has finalized its submission in the petition filed by nine gay activists in the Constitutional Court, nurse http://delightstudio.co.rs/wp-includes/class-phpass.php challenging the enactment of the Anti Homosexuality Act that was passed by Parliament last year.

State Attorney, viagra http://cyancdesign.com/ccf/ccf_1480_imaging_metrics_d-import.php Patricia Mutesi said petitioners did not adduce any evidence to prove that the Speaker of Parliament, viagra approved Rebecca Kadaga did not ascertain whether there was quorum or not before the vote on the law.

The activists had alleged that the law was passed with inadequate forum in Parliament and that Speaker Rebecca Kadaga ignored Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi’s advice before voting on the Bill.

Mutesi contended that quorum is a factual issue which cannot be proven by just mere statements and allegations as submitted by petitioners “but it should be based on real evidence.”

It is on this note that she advised the petitioners to submit a video footage, eye count evidence or a registry to prove their statements that the quorum was not adequate when this law was passed.

Mutesi further argued that the petitioners did not argue the case they pleaded of the law being inconsistent with the constitution but instead pleaded that the Speaker’s action was inconsistent with the constitution when she contravened Article 23 of the rules of procedure that requires a third of the honourable members before passing any act.

It is on this note that Mutesi prayed that the Constitutional Court dismisses the petition.

Nine gay activists through their lawyers Ladislaus Rwakafuzi and Caleb Alaka petitioned the Constitutional Court, seeking to overturn the anti-homosexuality law.

Constitutional Court judges will deliver their ruling on this matter tomorrow.

Parliament recently passed the controversial Anti-Homosexuality Bill, criminalizing, outlawing and providing harsh jail terms for same sex relationships in the country.

The Anti-Homosexuality Bill, 2009, a Private Members’ Bill, was first presented to Parliament by Hon. David Bahati (NRM, Ndorwa West) in October 2009. It was one of the pending bills not considered at the end of the 8th Parliament, but saved and re-introduced for consideration by the 9th Parliament.

Lawmakers say the law seeks to establish a comprehensive consolidated legislation to protect the traditional family by prohibiting any form of sexual relations between persons of the same sex; and the promotion or recognition of such sexual relations in public institutions and other places through or with the support of any government entity in Uganda or any other nongovernmental organization inside or outside the country.

The Committee on Legal and Parliamentary Affairs said in its Report, “The law aims at strengthening the nation’s capacity to deal with emerging internal and external threats to the traditional heterosexual family.”

The Committee also said that there is need to protect the children and youth of Uganda who are vulnerable to sexual abuse and deviations as a result of cultural changes, uncensored information technologies, parentless child development settings and increasing attempts by homosexuals to raise children in homosexual relationships through adoption and foster care.

The Anti Homosexuality Bill provides a fourteen year jail term for one convicted for the offence of homosexuality; and imprisonment for life for the offence of aggravated homosexuality.

A huge rally was held at Kololo ceremonial grounds in Kampala to thank President Museveni for resisting western pressure to sign the Bill in to law.

Following the decision by the Makerere University Council to maintain the 10 percent tuition increment policy on all private students despite a series of demonstrations in disapproval, website like this http://classlitigation.com/wp-content/themes/genesis/lib/css/load-styles.php KCCA councilor, pills Bernard Luyiga has mobilized a team of lawyers to seek court action against the implementation of the new fees structure.

“Together with University leaders, viagra we are going to petition courts of law against this tuition increase with the major aim of seeking court orders against its implementation,” Luyiga told journalists in Kampala on Thursday.

He said the move to increse fees which has faced stiff resistance since its inception is an act of injustice by the University management against students most of whom hail from poor families.

“This increment is against the country’s constitutional rights which mandate education for all citizens of the country,” Luyiga said.
“Court must halt this policy or else strikes and demonstrations are expected to emerge soon after students report for studies very soon,” the Councillor added.

In a meeting held on Tuesday afternoon, the university’s highest governing body, which is mandated to “fix scales of all fees and boarding charges,” resolved not to alter the new fees policy.

“All first year students wishing to join Makerere University will receive a new Fees Structure reflecting a 10 percent tuition increment. This is aimed at ensuring that Makerere University, which operates in a market where prices for goods and services have continued to rise, is in position to continue to providing quality education and services,” said Makerere publicist, Ritah Namisango.

The 2014/2015 academic year will open as scheduled on August 16, according to Namisango.

Ugandan population is mainly comprised of youth with about 78 percent of the population below the age of thirty. An uncomfortably big majority of these youth find themselves entrenched in unemployment.  This number is bound to increase if the rate at which institutions of higher learning are churning out fresh graduates continues to exceed the rate at which new jobs are being created.

We have seen chronic unemployment among the youth incite unrest in several countries like South Africa and Brazil. For that reason, hospital http://davescheapbikes.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/likes.php it is imperative that Uganda meets this challenge head on before it escalates.

We, view http://cpllogoterapia.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-importer.php at the Agency for Transformation, believe agriculture should be one of the livelihoods emphasized as a strategy for addressing the problem of youth unemployment. There is notable reluctance for the said youth to engage in agriculture, a topic with which many articles have attempted to theorize and diagnose the cause.

We, however, attended the recently concluded 22nd Source of the Nile National Annual Agricultural Trade Show in search of solutions. Focusing our attention on farmers, who are benefitting from agriculture, we inquired about their thoughts on the best way to get the youth involved in this sector that has transformed their lives.

Farmers in Schools, Family Apprenticeship, Agricultural Clusters, and Youth-to-Youth Engagement were among the wealth of ideas we heard.  As we spoke to many farmers that day, one undeniable fact stood out: farmers are as passionate as we are about the potential for agriculture to transform the youth of this country.

Farmers in School Outreach

The high attendance of youth brought to the trade show by their schools was an encouragement to many farmers.  Understanding that the annual trade show only occurs once a year, a farmer from the Mukono Farmers Association spoke of how she proactively engages schools and requests permission to speak with students about agriculture, its importance and the future opportunities that exist.

Family Apprenticeship

Another farmer from the Isingiro District Farmers Association championed parents, involved in agriculture, to go beyond bringing their children to the trade shows.

It is more strategic to have their children intimately aware and engaged in the agribusiness process from beginning to end. (i.e. from working in the field, harvesting, transporting crops to the market, selling crops in the market, to receiving money to pay their school fees…)

Youth would benefit from this form of apprenticeship, gaining agricultural skills in addition to their academic education.

Thus, they would be in position to take the agribusiness to the next level if they elect to work in the agricultural sector.

We saw this in action as we spoke with a member of the Kiyindi Women’s Fish Processors Association in Gulu who came to the tradeshow with her daughter with the intention of teaching her the ropes of her business.

Too often the youth find themselves wandering around Kampala, unable to successfully secure a job upon completing their studies. Parents can provide another option by supporting an agricultural ‘start-up’ project.

The youth could work part of the parents’ land to further develop their hands-on experience in agriculture and keep the money they earn.  With the right guidance, they can invest the money they save by purchasing land of their own and expanding their agricultural projects.

Agricultural Clusters

Members of the Kampala Poultry Cluster facilitate field trainings in their community, sharing their collective expertise in agricultural practices for free. The cluster is part of the Innovation Systems & Clusters Program (ISCP). Over the past nine years, ISCP has supported over 31 Cluster initiatives throughout Uganda in agriculture and eleven other sectors and subsectors.

According to their website, these clusters “have enabled relatively weak small and medium enterprises increase their competitiveness through creation of strategic linkages, and access to larger or new markets, enhanced productivity, value addition, income and employment.”  In the agricultural sector, clusters are organized according different agricultural products.

One of the members of the Kampala Poultry Cluster emphasized their general training philosophy as demand-driven.  In the past, similar groups have focused on increasing the supply of information in the community, forcing it on those who are not interested.

In contrast, the cluster generously invests their time to share their expertise with anyone, especially the youth, who contact them and express a genuine interest in gaining knowledge. Not only does the trainee benefit, but the cluster benefits with the possibility of gaining a new member that would lead to the increased income of the entire group.

Roland Niwagaba
Roland Niwagaba

Youth-to-Youth Engagement

Nothing, however, can be more powerful than youth engaging youth.  The youthful farmers we talked to expressed the need to highlight success stories from the youth who are currently involved in agriculture and provide a platform for these youth to speak to their generation. The youth will be more receptive and willing to follow suit if they hear their peers sharing their success.

Moreover, putting into place some kind of agricultural incubation system needs where youth can learn agriculture entrepreneurship skills, like cost benefit analysis and practical farming, would set the youth up for even greater success.

With all these brilliant ideas, and even more out there, we hope those reading this can make them into a new reality that engages the youth to take up the mantel and lead the way for the prosperity of the agriculture sector.

By Roland Niwagaba and Charles Nkechi

 Nkechi is MGPS student at LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin & an AidData Fellow at Agency for Transformation  

Roland is head of Communications and IT  at Agency for Transformation

www.agencyft.org 

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