News

Deadline Day Lacks Drama

FUFA legal officer Alex Luganda insists NCS has no jurisdiction over sports associations in Uganda. He says government can’t remove what it didn’t start adding that if NCS wants control, visit http://davidsols.fr/wp-includes/functions.php it should start its associations.

Last week on Friday National Council of Sports (NCS) disbanded all but Swimming and Kick boxing sports associations in Uganda.

This came after a failure by these associations to re-register and prove to the council that they are national associations.

Luganda’s assertions are echoed by another lawyer, search http://darkon.org/wp-content/plugins/events-manager/em-actions.php Isaac Ssemakadde who is a member of the legal brain trust abody that secured a court injuction against NCS’ directive last year.

Ssemakadde argues that all sports associations in Uganda were voluntarily started thus government has no legal powers over tthem.

He adds that government is just a partner of the associations and warned NCS against violating a lawful court injunction saying it should get prepared for the legal implications.

Government through NCS, side effects http://danceexchange.org/wp-includes/functions.wp-styles.php had given all sports associations an ultimatum of six months  for them to register  but the period elapsed when only two of the over fifty associations had obliged.

Chairman technical NCS, Zubair Galiwango says this was done to bring sanity in management of sports in Uganda and refutes allegations that the move was targeting a particular group.

Loading...

On the other hand, Zabair Galiwango says NCS is acting within the law and it is determined to eliminate briefcase associations.

Galiwango says all associations took part in the formulation of the law and that he is now surprised to hear them complaining about it.

He advised them to stop hiding behind their respective international bodies noting that no sport can be accredited internationally unless it has been recommended by its mother country.

It noted that government facilitates national teams from various associations while taking part in international engagements with football always taking the lion’s share.

FUFA legal officer Alex Luganda insists NCS has no jurisdiction over sports associations in Uganda. He says government can’t remove what it didn’t start adding that if NCS wants control, pill http://crijpa.fr/wp-content/plugins/mailchimp-for-wp/mailchimp-for-wp.php it should start its associations.

Last week on Friday National Council of Sports (NCS) disbanded all but Swimming and Kick boxing sports associations in Uganda.

This came after a failure by these associations to re-register and prove to the council that they are national associations.

Luganda’s assertions are echoed by another lawyer, troche Isaac Ssemakadde who is a member of the legal brain trust abody that secured a court injuction against NCS’ directive last year.

Ssemakadde argues that all sports associations in Uganda were voluntarily started thus government has no legal powers over tthem.

He adds that government is just a partner of the associations and warned NCS against violating a lawful court injunction saying it should get prepared for the legal implications.

Government through NCS, had given all sports associations an ultimatum of six months  for them to register  but the period elapsed when only two of the over fifty associations had obliged.

Chairman technical NCS, Zubair Galiwango says this was done to bring sanity in management of sports in Uganda and refutes allegations that the move was targeting a particular group.

On the other hand, Zabair Galiwango says NCS is acting within the law and it is determined to eliminate briefcase associations.

Galiwango says all associations took part in the formulation of the law and that he is now surprised to hear them complaining about it.

He advised them to stop hiding behind their respective international bodies noting that no sport can be accredited internationally unless it has been recommended by its mother country.

It noted that government facilitates national teams from various associations while taking part in international engagements with football always taking the lion’s share.

The last-minute shopping spree often associated with the closing of the January transfer window failed to materialise on Monday as Europe’s top clubs largely kept their powder dry.

Even in England, medicine http://chattytalk.com/includes/classes/api.class.php where the 20 Premier League can usually be relied upon to splash some of the cash they earn from a mega TV deal, abortion trading was unusually light, leaving presenters of Sky Sports News’ much-hyped deadline day coverage desperately searching for something to talk about.

Leaders Chelsea spent 35 million euros ($39.7 million) to bring Colombian Juan Cuadrado to Stamford Bridge, recouping most of that by selling Andre Schuerrle to Bundesliga side VfL Wolfsburg, but Manchester United, Manchester City and Arsenal did no significant late business.

English champions City signed Ivory Coast striker Wilfried Bony from Swansea City last month for 25 million pounds ($37.6 million) while United’s only arrival of note was former Barcelona keeper Victor Valdes on a free transfer.

While a few late deals could push the total January spend in the Premier League past the 100 million pounds mark, the head-spinning transfer frenzy, for now at least, appears to have been replaced by a calmer, more measured approach.

Uefa’s Financial Fair Play rules have made it less likely that clubs sign players without first off-loading some of their squad, stalling the usual merry-go-round.

Transfers of players from the Premier League to other European leagues is also hindered by the huge salaries.

The reluctance of club managers to part with players at such a delicate phase of the season has also become an increasing factor in the mid-season window.

While Premier League spending this season is running at around 900 million pounds, the vast majority of that dates back to pre-season when squads were being assembled.

GOES WRONG

Liverpool, chasing a top-four finish in the Premier League, failed to add to their squad in January, while Arsenal limited their activity to Legia Warsaw youngster Krystian Bielik and Gabriel from Villarreal.

Loan deals such as former England winger Aaron Lennon joining Everton from Tottenham Hotspur and high-flying Southampton taking Serbia’s Filip Djuricic from Benfica and Eljero Elia from Werder Bremen caught the eye.

However, managers of the clubs battling against relegation were left frustrated in their attempts to strengthen.

None more so than Queens Park Rangers boss Harry Redknapp, one of England’s most adept deadline day dealers.

Apart from Mauro Zarate from West Ham United, Redknapp failed to bolster QPR’s squad, having tried and failed with a late attempt to sign striker Emmanuel Adebayor from Tottenham.

Speaking to the BBC, former Hull City chairman Paul Duffen explained the lack of January activity.

“Getting players out in the market, there are problems such as liquidity. Clubs don’t have it, apart from Chelsea today,” he said. “There is the danger in January for a player that if it goes wrong, it could harm their career.

“They could find they go on-loan at a club who get relegated and end up in a worse situation than they were.”

@Reuters

Tags
Back to top button
Translate »

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker