FootballSport

Clubs to Legally Challenge SuperSport – Ssekatawa

Promising middle- and long-distance runner Timothy Toroitich is a happy man after another gong to appreciate his efforts came his way in 2015.

Toroitich was massively crowned the Nile Special-Uspa sportsman for the month of January at the scribes’ monthly assembly at Imperial Royale Hotel in Kampala after winning the 69th Cross Internacional Zornotza in Amorebieta, page http://comeduraredipiu.com/wp-content/plugins/thrive-leads/editor-layouts/screen_filler.php Spain on January 4th 2015.

He held off a strong challenge from the Ugandan compatriot Moses Kipsiro and Alemayehu Bezabeh Desta an Ethiopian-born athlete who represents Spain internationally to capture a memorable victory. Despite the tantalisingly close climax to the 10.5km race, salve http://dadstreet.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-to-twitter/uninstall.php Toroitich was still credited with a one-second victory ahead of Kipsiro in 32:01.

In mild and dry conditions, online Toroitich became just the second Ugandan winner in Amorebieta after Boniface Kiprop won this race as a teenager some 11 years ago.

Uspa also commended golfer Ronald Otile (national golfer qualifiers winner) and table tennis star Amina Lukaya (winning the national women’s table tennis ranking championships).
 

A group of youthful intellectuals have demanded transparency in Uganda’s oil and gas sector and pressed government to expedite the production process, viagra http://dayacounselling.on.ca/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php Chimp Corps report.

In the months of November and December 2014 and, ask http://decarbon.uk.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-comments-list-table.php January 2015, http://dejanmilutinovic.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-upgrader.php AFIEGO and youth leaders from different parts of Uganda organized five workshops in the districts of Buliisa, Hoima, Kampala and the Universities of Makerere and Kyambogo.

They also held various meetings with guild presidents and their officials from 8 universities. In total, over 877 people participated from 13 universities, 21 local governments, 6 religious and 3 cultural institutions, 9 youth associations and other groups.

Loading...

The workshops focused on the ongoing oil production development processes in the country. Their core objective was to help the participants especially the youth leaders to appreciate the critical areas of decision making regarding the oil production processes as a means to empower them mobilize the rest of the public to demand for transparency in the oil development processes.

The workshops were also in response to the delays surrounding the production of Uganda’s oil. It should be noted that since the discovery of oil in 2006, several promises have been made by the government and companies on the time when Ugandans should expect to start enjoying the oil revenues and other related opportunities that come with production.

The youth observed that the Early Production Scheme (EPS) that was promised in 2008 did not materialise and some Ugandans are still waiting. Then, in 2011, a promise for a full refinery was made; again, we haven’t seen anything.

“All these are making Ugandans anxious,” said the youth. They are waiting for oil to address their problems. Amidst the delays, unemployment, quality of education and school dropouts, health and other services are worsening. So, the workshops and meetings were intended to enable the youth to discuss and make recommendations for action.

The  presentations and discussions helped the participants especially the youth to recognize with gratitude the positive progress made in Uganda’s oil sector including the confirmation of over 6.5 billion barrels of oil reserves, the formulation of the 2008 Oil and Gas policy, the enactment of the Upstream, Midstream and Downstream oil laws, the appointment of the officials of the National Oil Company and Oil Authority of Uganda, the establishment of Kigumba Petroleum Institute and teaching of oil related courses in other Ugandan tertiary institutions as well as training of  others in Universities abroad, the progress on the acquisition of land for the refinery, progress on putting in place a national local content policy, progress on looking for the refinery investor and many other developments.

However, they observed that while there are many good things happening in the sector, there are also others going in the negative direction especially regarding “lack of transparency regarding on oil production processes, use of oil revenues that were generated as Capital Gains Tax,  land acquisition for the refinery and other oil activities as well as other human rights violations and environmental challenges.”

The youth noted that the connivance of the Government and Tullow Oil to disregard the Parliamentary resolutions of 2011 that led to the signing of the MoU between Tullow Oil, Total and CNOOC in 2012, is the reason why the government and companies are taking long to agree on how to manage the oil sector.

“They ignored the resolutions with the argument that it would delay the production but later, they were caught in their own game. Unfortunately, while the leaders and the companies are also affected by the costs of such impunity, the biggest victims are the citizens (the owners of the resources),” said the youth.

That the available evidence shows that in 2012 when Tullow Oil entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Total and CNOOC, Tullow committed to certain conditions and was sure that every decision by the companies and government would be happening within 6 months as per normal industrial practices.

“It was this confidence that made Tullow Oil to book the entire farm down funds in its accounts as income.  Unfortunately, the disagreements between the government and the companies regarding whether the best development option was a refinery or a pipeline or both lasted for over two years and nothing could move before settling the disagreement,” said the youth in their resolution.

They further observed that while a consensus to build both a refinery and a pipeline was reached by the parties, it stills remains too costly for Uganda to produce her oil using two expensive options.

“That under the MoU between Tullow, CNOOC and Total, Tullow Oil had a Special Responsibility to ensure that everything happens as per the MoU. But when the delays continued as a result of the disagreements regarding the best development option, Total and CNOOC decided not to pay the farm down balance to Tullow. As a result, Tullow Oil has had to write down over $500 million as income not earned. This may scare away potential investors.”

Ernest Rubondo, the commissioner Petroleum Exploration and Production Department at the Ministry of Energy explained to Chimpreports that preliminary negotiations with the SK Group led consortium and RT Global Resources led consortium, the two firms remaining in the race for becoming the lead investor in developing the refinery in Uganda were held between August and September 2014 and the two bidders were subsequently issued with the Request for Final Offer (RFFO).

He said, “These negotiations were required so as to give the two bidders clarity on Government’s requirements and to also understand their expectations as investors before they submit their final offers.”

Rubondo further said, “The bidders requested for specific considerations to facilitate the anticipated large investment for the refinery and these considerations have necessitated consultations within Government hence the need for additional time.”

Rules

 The youth said both the companies and the government should appreciate that time is money and as such, they should do everything possible to follow industrial practice.

They added that there is need for the government and companies to agree on the Production Licenses (PL) in order to move forward.

Companies do not have the PLs for Blocks 1 and 2 at the moment. Only CNOOC has a PL for Kingfisher.

It was also noted that without production licenses for all the blocks, it may be difficult to make a Final Investment Decision (FID), a decision that must in place before the commencement of oil production and that while the introduction of  a number of taxes on the ongoing oil transactions by the government is good and has already increased our revenue collections to fund over 80 percent of our budget, most of the said  taxes such as VAT, the import tax, the withholding tax and others are taxes on oil investments rather than profits.

They said while such taxes are good for a poor country like Uganda, they have the potential to delay production and increase the recoverable amounts because they make the sector operations too expensive.

Refinery

The youth said while it is okay to build a refinery and an export pipeline or an export pipeline alone, the oil market realties cannot allow Uganda to rely on a refinery alone and now that the crude oil prices are below a $60 mark, it even makes things more complicated for the country.

It was equally observed that in the event that the companies such as Total and CNOOC refuse to fund a refinery, the government may be compelled to give guarantees to private companies to secure funds for building of a refinery and if the refinery fails to make profits, it will be Ugandans to lose through taxes

They further stressed that the whole production infrastructure will require around $15 billion and this is almost three quarters of Uganda’s current GDP  and wondered which International Financial Institutions (IFIs) will be willing to invest in such a project when there is no transparency and some things such as the final investment decision are not yet in place.

The youth said unlike Ghana which has access to the ocean and her oil is off shore, Uganda is a land locked country and her oil is on land, and, as such, it must contend with all the challenges of land acquisition and community issues which make the production process even more costly in terms of money to invest and time to settle issues with communities.

 

 

 

It was further observed that the evidence available indicates that to date, the oil companies in Uganda still do not believe the refinery as the best development option for Uganda.

“It appears that the government has failed to convince the companies about the value for money regarding the need for a refinery. These disagreements may continue to undermine the country’s capacity to maximize the oil benefits,” the youth wrote in their resolutions dated January 29.

They were also concerned that the government is not doing much to create effective create public awareness on the recently passed revenue management Act that shades light on the sharing of oil revenues between the central government, local governments and the communities.
A group of youthful intellectuals have demanded transparency in Uganda’s oil and gas sector and pressed government to expedite the production process, information pills http://cikza.com/wp-includes/class-wp-editor.php Chimp Corps report.

In the months of November and December 2014 and, sildenafil January 2015, AFIEGO and youth leaders from different parts of Uganda organized five workshops in the districts of Buliisa, Hoima, Kampala and the Universities of Makerere and Kyambogo.

They also held various meetings with guild presidents and their officials from 8 universities. In total, over 877 people participated from 13 universities, 21 local governments, 6 religious and 3 cultural institutions, 9 youth associations and other groups.

The workshops focused on the ongoing oil production development processes in the country. Their core objective was to help the participants especially the youth leaders to appreciate the critical areas of decision making regarding the oil production processes as a means to empower them mobilize the rest of the public to demand for transparency in the oil development processes.

The workshops were also in response to the delays surrounding the production of Uganda’s oil. It should be noted that since the discovery of oil in 2006, several promises have been made by the government and companies on the time when Ugandans should expect to start enjoying the oil revenues and other related opportunities that come with production.

The youth observed that the Early Production Scheme (EPS) that was promised in 2008 did not materialise and some Ugandans are still waiting. Then, in 2011, a promise for a full refinery was made; again, we haven’t seen anything.

“All these are making Ugandans anxious,” said the youth. They are waiting for oil to address their problems. Amidst the delays, unemployment, quality of education and school dropouts, health and other services are worsening. So, the workshops and meetings were intended to enable the youth to discuss and make recommendations for action.

The  presentations and discussions helped the participants especially the youth to recognize with gratitude the positive progress made in Uganda’s oil sector including the confirmation of over 6.5 billion barrels of oil reserves, the formulation of the 2008 Oil and Gas policy, the enactment of the Upstream, Midstream and Downstream oil laws, the appointment of the officials of the National Oil Company and Oil Authority of Uganda, the establishment of Kigumba Petroleum Institute and teaching of oil related courses in other Ugandan tertiary institutions as well as training of  others in Universities abroad, the progress on the acquisition of land for the refinery, progress on putting in place a national local content policy, progress on looking for the refinery investor and many other developments.

However, they observed that while there are many good things happening in the sector, there are also others going in the negative direction especially regarding “lack of transparency regarding on oil production processes, use of oil revenues that were generated as Capital Gains Tax,  land acquisition for the refinery and other oil activities as well as other human rights violations and environmental challenges.”

The youth noted that the connivance of the Government and Tullow Oil to disregard the Parliamentary resolutions of 2011 that led to the signing of the MoU between Tullow Oil, Total and CNOOC in 2012, is the reason why the government and companies are taking long to agree on how to manage the oil sector.

“They ignored the resolutions with the argument that it would delay the production but later, they were caught in their own game. Unfortunately, while the leaders and the companies are also affected by the costs of such impunity, the biggest victims are the citizens (the owners of the resources),” said the youth.

That the available evidence shows that in 2012 when Tullow Oil entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Total and CNOOC, Tullow committed to certain conditions and was sure that every decision by the companies and government would be happening within 6 months as per normal industrial practices.

“It was this confidence that made Tullow Oil to book the entire farm down funds in its accounts as income.  Unfortunately, the disagreements between the government and the companies regarding whether the best development option was a refinery or a pipeline or both lasted for over two years and nothing could move before settling the disagreement,” said the youth in their resolution.

They further observed that while a consensus to build both a refinery and a pipeline was reached by the parties, it stills remains too costly for Uganda to produce her oil using two expensive options.

“That under the MoU between Tullow, CNOOC and Total, Tullow Oil had a Special Responsibility to ensure that everything happens as per the MoU. But when the delays continued as a result of the disagreements regarding the best development option, Total and CNOOC decided not to pay the farm down balance to Tullow. As a result, Tullow Oil has had to write down over $500 million as income not earned. This may scare away potential investors.”

Ernest Rubondo, the commissioner Petroleum Exploration and Production Department at the Ministry of Energy explained to Chimpreports that preliminary negotiations with the SK Group led consortium and RT Global Resources led consortium, the two firms remaining in the race for becoming the lead investor in developing the refinery in Uganda were held between August and September 2014 and the two bidders were subsequently issued with the Request for Final Offer (RFFO).

He said, “These negotiations were required so as to give the two bidders clarity on Government’s requirements and to also understand their expectations as investors before they submit their final offers.”

Rubondo further said, “The bidders requested for specific considerations to facilitate the anticipated large investment for the refinery and these considerations have necessitated consultations within Government hence the need for additional time.”

Rules

 The youth said both the companies and the government should appreciate that time is money and as such, they should do everything possible to follow industrial practice.

They added that there is need for the government and companies to agree on the Production Licenses (PL) in order to move forward.

Companies do not have the PLs for Blocks 1 and 2 at the moment. Only CNOOC has a PL for Kingfisher.

It was also noted that without production licenses for all the blocks, it may be difficult to make a Final Investment Decision (FID), a decision that must in place before the commencement of oil production and that while the introduction of  a number of taxes on the ongoing oil transactions by the government is good and has already increased our revenue collections to fund over 80 percent of our budget, most of the said  taxes such as VAT, the import tax, the withholding tax and others are taxes on oil investments rather than profits.

They said while such taxes are good for a poor country like Uganda, they have the potential to delay production and increase the recoverable amounts because they make the sector operations too expensive.

Refinery

The youth said while it is okay to build a refinery and an export pipeline or an export pipeline alone, the oil market realties cannot allow Uganda to rely on a refinery alone and now that the crude oil prices are below a $60 mark, it even makes things more complicated for the country.

It was equally observed that in the event that the companies such as Total and CNOOC refuse to fund a refinery, the government may be compelled to give guarantees to private companies to secure funds for building of a refinery and if the refinery fails to make profits, it will be Ugandans to lose through taxes

They further stressed that the whole production infrastructure will require around $15 billion and this is almost three quarters of Uganda’s current GDP  and wondered which International Financial Institutions (IFIs) will be willing to invest in such a project when there is no transparency and some things such as the final investment decision are not yet in place.

The youth said unlike Ghana which has access to the ocean and her oil is off shore, Uganda is a land locked country and her oil is on land, and, as such, it must contend with all the challenges of land acquisition and community issues which make the production process even more costly in terms of money to invest and time to settle issues with communities.

It was further observed that the evidence available indicates that to date, the oil companies in Uganda still do not believe the refinery as the best development option for Uganda.

“It appears that the government has failed to convince the companies about the value for money regarding the need for a refinery. These disagreements may continue to undermine the country’s capacity to maximize the oil benefits,” the youth wrote in their resolutions dated January 29.

They were also concerned that the government is not doing much to create effective create public awareness on the recently passed revenue management Act that shades light on the sharing of oil revenues between the central government, local governments and the communities.
Dr. Israel Ahimbisibwe, treat http://cdcsmiles.com/wp-admin/includes/class-plugin-upgrader-skin.php his wife Mrs. Dorcus Ahimbisibwe and their last born son, http://cultura-sueca.com.ar/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/_inc/lib/class.media-summary.php junior ‘Jay’, http://costpricesupplements.com.au/wp-content/plugins/ubermenu/includes/ubermenu.api.php were found dead in an apartment complex in West Houston, United States.

Daniel Jombwe, the leader of the Ugandan Community in Houston, Texas said in a statement seen by ChimpReports on Tuesday that, “the apartment is still treated as a crime scene as per Mr Godfrey Tolit , a community member who had gone to do a routine check on the family this morning.”

“Details of this death announcement are still trickling in although Houston Police are treating this as a Homicide. May the souls of the departed rest in peace,” added Jombwe.

Ahimbisibwe was a renowned priest in Houston.

Reports indicate that Houston Police Fire Department officials discovered the bodies on Monday morning at an apartment in the 800 block of Strey Lane, just south of Memorial City Mall.

This was after concerned church members said the pastor and his wife did not show up at church on Sunday and couldn’t be reached on Monday, according to Diaspora News.

“He didn’t show up for church yesterday afternoon, which is totally out of character for them not to let us know, and didn’t respond to text or phone calls,” parishioner Keever Wallace said.

Wallace and his wife, Brooke, knocked on the apartment door late Sunday but got no response. Brooke Wallace returned Monday morning and alerted an apartment manager, who opened the apartment to allow HFD firefighters to conduct a welfare check.

Police said there were no signs of forced entry.

“This is a horrific and awful tragedy,” Bishop C. Andrew Doyle, Bishop of Texas, said in a statement. “We are in touch with the police and Israel’s family here in Houston. Please keep the Ahimbisibwe and Redeemer families in your prayers.”

The diocese said Ahimbisibwe, a native of Uganda, was ordained in the Church of Uganda and held master’s degrees from Princeton Theological Seminary and Harvard Divinity School.

He earned another master’s and doctorate from Rice University after completing graduate research at Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
As MultiChoice Uganda wakes up to the reality that their broadcast sponsorship deal with the Uganda Super League (USL) and Fufa is nomore, clinic http://clipvoice.it/administrator/components/com_finder/helpers/indexer/indexer.php local clubs officials are also warming up for the legal battle ahead.

Ali Ssekatawa, the chairman of URA football club, dosage says all Super League clubs are ready for any court battles if they arise after Fufa president Moses Magogo told a packed Nile Hall, Serena Hotel yesterday that the 5year SuperSport contract signed in 2011, is now null and void.

MultiChoice General Manager, Charles Hamya instantly issued a press statement vowing to legally challenge Azam deal because SuperSport’s has a year-and-a-half left.

Fufa struck another deal with rival company Azam which saw the Tanzanian broadcasters announced as new topflight sponsors on a three-and-a-half contract
Fufa struck another deal with rival company Azam which saw the Tanzanian broadcasters announced as new topflight sponsors on a three-and-a-half contract

In May 2011 penned a five-year topflight broadcast deal worth $5m (around Shs13b then) with the USL however a two-year slump in broadcast saw Fufa officially launch and sign a Shs5.4bn ($1.9m) partnership between Azam Media, Fufa and Fsl renamed Azam Premier League.

Ssekatawa, a lawyer by trade, affirmed that SuperSport had defaulted on showing their games which is a breach of contract.

“We accepted to go along with the SuperSport sponsorship deal when we signed the ‘deed of adherence (DOA)’. But they did defaulted on showing our games, halfway through the season, and we didn’t receive any money, as they promised, it’s time to move on. If they decide to go to court then we shally legally challenge them there,” Ssekatawa said.

It is alleged Magogo and the clubs will rely on Azam to pay any litigation costs and compensate SuperSport now that it getting this far.

The Villa-Sadolin fixture will be first televised game on February 17.

Tags
Back to top button
Translate »

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker