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Opinion: Why Besigye, Mbabazi Lost the 2016 General Elections



President Yoweri Museveni has described as unconvincing, visit this http://chuaxuattinhsom.info/wp-includes/class-http.php the proposed amendments in the country’s pension sector that seek to open in up to private players.

The ministry of finance planning and economic development introduced on the floor of parliament, ailment the Retirement Benefits Sector Liberalization Bill which if passed would put an end to the ‘monopolistic powers’ of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF) to run the county’s pension sector.

Matia Kasaija [L] the Minister of Finance which introduced the Pensions liberalization Bill

The new reforms presently being fostered by the regulatory body Uganda Retirements Benefits Regulatory Authority (URBRA) would see private companies come on board to manage worker’s savings, which currently remains solely the responsibility of NSSF.

President Yoweri Museveni on Tuesday evening made it clear that the proposed amendments don’t have his backing.

Former Finance Minister Syda Bbumba

Former Finance Minister Syda Bbumba

“I am a good soldier when I am convinced,” he said. “But nobody has convinced me about why the pension sector needs liberalization.”

“Some people have been coming to me with this idea that the sector will be more efficient when private players are allowed in, but I just kept quiet.”

Museveni was last night speaking at the NSSF’s 30th anniversary dinner held at Serena Conference Center in Kampala.

Guests arrive at the dinner

Guests arrive at the dinner

He defended the status quo, noting that splitting up the management of workers’ savings would hamper the enhancement of its value.

“Having one player as is the case today is advantageous in a way that you have this huge sum of money which is available for any useful projects,” he said.

“Unless these people (URBRA) are saying that the fund is being mismanaged, they’ll really have to convince me more.”

Museveni with the Finance Minister, NSSF MD and Board Chairman Patrick Byabakama Kaberenge

Museveni with the Finance Minister, NSSF MD and Board Chairman Patrick Byabakama Kaberenge [R]

He further explained that bringing more players on board would make management of pension funds more expensive.

“Now we are paying one set of managers very well, but if you disperse the sector, you will have a bigger group of managers to pay,” he noted.

UBC' Jane Kasumba

UBC’ Jane Kasumba

Proponents of the pension liberalization assert that it is not only effective, but has also worked smoothly in a number of countries.

They also believe that private players would encourage more savers to come on board, thereby expanding the pension sector. Currently, about 200,000 workers are saving with NSSF.

The reforms however have faced stiff resistance from a number of stakeholders majorly the current leadership of NSSF, who went as far as engaging members of parliament to convince them to shelve the bill, much to the disappointment of URBRA.

At the function, President Museveni praised the NSSF’s managing director Richard Byarugaba for revamping the fund it its current glory.

Museveni said he reappointed Byarugaba to reward his hard work

Museveni said he reappointed Byarugaba to reward his hard work

This he said was the reason he renewed his contract in October last year. .

“This man has grown NSSF from Shs 1.8billion to 6trillion today. And then I heard people saying agende, angende. Why do you send away people who are doing some good work?” queried Museveni to loud cheering.

NSSF which started as a small department of the Ministry of Labor in 1967 was rolled out in 1985 as an autonomous body, following a set of reforms in the social security sector.

Dance performers at the dinner

Dance performers at the dinner

In the last 5 years, the fund has seen its assets grow from Shs 1.8billion to 6 trillion, the equivalent of 6% of the county’s GDP; making it the largest social security fund in East Africa.

Speaking at the event, the MD Mr Byarugaba asked the president to include the NSSF amongst his favorite government parastatals.

“You have recognized a lot of parastatals that have performed well, most notably URA and KCCA. Today we’d like you to include and mention us amongst those government bodies that have added value to their customers,” he implored. The president nodded gently in his seat, in approval.

Museveni hands a Leadership award to Christine Kyayongo, wife of the deceased former NSSF Chairman Ivan Kyayonka

Museveni hands a Leadership award to Christine Kyayonka, wife of the deceased former NSSF Chairman Ivan Kyayonka

“One if the challenges we used to face was the turnaround time. It used to take us 105 days to pay our members. Today a member needs only 10 days to have their benefits wired onto their accounts,” Byarugaba bragged.

“Our compliance level has also grown. We used to be at 50%. (The number of companies registered with us that did pay their workers savings). Today the compliance exceeds 80% and so is our customer satisfaction level.”

Ministry of Gender's Permanent Secretary Pius Bigirimana [L] who is also on the NSSF Board, chats with the Finance Minister Matia Kasaija

Ministry of Gender’s Permanent Secretary Pius Bigirimana [L] who is also on the NSSF Board chats with the Finance Minister Matia Kasaija

In turn, the president advised the fund to start investing in long term government projects especially infrastructure.

“I encourage you to invest in our infrastructure such as power dams, the railway and roads,” he said.

Museveni poses withe NSF leadership

Museveni poses withe NSF leadership

Real estate too Museveni added, would be a lucrative venture for the fund.

“The demand for houses is very big. The people in the Diaspora are making a lot of money and they want to build houses. They send money to their relatives who just eat it, until they are discouraged and they give up. They need someone to liberate them from their relatives.”
President Yoweri Museveni has described as unconvincing, more about http://comeduraredipiu.com/wp-content/plugins/thrive-leads/editor-templates/lightbox/38_set.php the proposed amendments in the country’s pension sector that seek to open in up to private players.

The ministry of finance planning and economic development introduced on the floor of parliament, visit the Retirement Benefits Sector Liberalization Bill which if passed would put an end to the ‘monopolistic powers’ of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF) to run the county’s pension sector.

Matia Kasaija [L] the Minister of Finance which introduced the Pensions liberalization Bill

The new reforms presently being fostered by the regulatory body Uganda Retirements Benefits Regulatory Authority (URBRA) would see private companies come on board to manage worker’s savings, see which currently remains solely the responsibility of NSSF.

President Yoweri Museveni on Tuesday evening made it clear that the proposed amendments don’t have his backing.

Former Finance Minister Syda Bbumba

Former Finance Minister Syda Bbumba

“I am a good soldier when I am convinced,” he said. “But nobody has convinced me about why the pension sector needs liberalization.”

“Some people have been coming to me with this idea that the sector will be more efficient when private players are allowed in, but I just kept quiet.”

Museveni was last night speaking at the NSSF’s 30th anniversary dinner held at Serena Conference Center in Kampala.

Guests arrive at the dinner

Guests arrive at the dinner

He defended the status quo, noting that splitting up the management of workers’ savings would hamper the enhancement of its value.

“Having one player as is the case today is advantageous in a way that you have this huge sum of money which is available for any useful projects,” he said.

“Unless these people (URBRA) are saying that the fund is being mismanaged, they’ll really have to convince me more.”

Museveni with the Finance Minister, NSSF MD and Board Chairman Patrick Byabakama Kaberenge

Museveni with the Finance Minister, NSSF MD and Board Chairman Patrick Byabakama Kaberenge [R]

He further explained that bringing more players on board would make management of pension funds more expensive.

“Now we are paying one set of managers very well, but if you disperse the sector, you will have a bigger group of managers to pay,” he noted.

UBC' Jane Kasumba

UBC’ Jane Kasumba

Proponents of the pension liberalization assert that it is not only effective, but has also worked smoothly in a number of countries.

They also believe that private players would encourage more savers to come on board, thereby expanding the pension sector. Currently, about 200,000 workers are saving with NSSF.

The reforms however have faced stiff resistance from a number of stakeholders majorly the current leadership of NSSF, who went as far as engaging members of parliament to convince them to shelve the bill, much to the disappointment of URBRA.

At the function, President Museveni praised the NSSF’s managing director Richard Byarugaba for revamping the fund it its current glory.

Museveni said he reappointed Byarugaba to reward his hard work

Museveni said he reappointed Byarugaba to reward his hard work

This he said was the reason he renewed his contract in October last year. .

“This man has grown NSSF from Shs 1.8billion to 6trillion today. And then I heard people saying agende, angende. Why do you send away people who are doing some good work?” queried Museveni to loud cheering.

NSSF which started as a small department of the Ministry of Labor in 1967 was rolled out in 1985 as an autonomous body, following a set of reforms in the social security sector.

Dance performers at the dinner

Dance performers at the dinner

In the last 5 years, the fund has seen its assets grow from Shs 1.8billion to 6 trillion, the equivalent of 6% of the county’s GDP; making it the largest social security fund in East Africa.

Speaking at the event, the MD Mr Byarugaba asked the president to include the NSSF amongst his favorite government parastatals.

“You have recognized a lot of parastatals that have performed well, most notably URA and KCCA. Today we’d like you to include and mention us amongst those government bodies that have added value to their customers,” he implored. The president nodded gently in his seat, in approval.

Museveni hands a Leadership award to Christine Kyayongo, wife of the deceased former NSSF Chairman Ivan Kyayonka

Museveni hands a Leadership award to Christine Kyayonka, wife of the deceased former NSSF Chairman Ivan Kyayonka

“One if the challenges we used to face was the turnaround time. It used to take us 105 days to pay our members. Today a member needs only 10 days to have their benefits wired onto their accounts,” Byarugaba bragged.

“Our compliance level has also grown. We used to be at 50%. (The number of companies registered with us that did pay their workers savings). Today the compliance exceeds 80% and so is our customer satisfaction level.”

Ministry of Gender's Permanent Secretary Pius Bigirimana [L] who is also on the NSSF Board, chats with the Finance Minister Matia Kasaija

Ministry of Gender’s Permanent Secretary Pius Bigirimana [L] who is also on the NSSF Board chats with the Finance Minister Matia Kasaija

In turn, the president advised the fund to start investing in long term government projects especially infrastructure.

“I encourage you to invest in our infrastructure such as power dams, the railway and roads,” he said.

Museveni poses withe NSF leadership

Museveni poses withe NSF leadership

Real estate too Museveni added, would be a lucrative venture for the fund.

“The demand for houses is very big. The people in the Diaspora are making a lot of money and they want to build houses. They send money to their relatives who just eat it, until they are discouraged and they give up. They need someone to liberate them from their relatives.”
By Ian Musiimenta  

Right from their declaration of ambitions, visit web http://charadas.org/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-users-list-table.php nominations and with the campaign trails of almost all the 8 presidential candidates for the 2016 general elections, health http://ceris.ca/wp-includes/class-requests.php one can easily tell how Uganda’s opposition lost the 2016 election.

From the recent Daily Monitor opinion poll conducted by a Nairobi based Infotrak Research and Consulting firm, http://craigpatchett.com/wp-includes/registration-functions.php President Museveni has been ranked leading with 60 percent followed by the Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) flag bearer, Kizza Besigye, with 21 percent as former premier Amama comes in third place with a 6 percent.

These polls have of course been received with mixed feelings and bad blood especially the opposition who have bashed them.

Recently while presenting a paper titled; “Enter the Dragon? The Contested candidacy of John Patrick Amama Mbabazi” held at the Centre for Basic Research in Kololo, a law don at Makerere University Prof. Joe Oloka Onyango predicted that the opposition will lose the 2016 election to the incumbent Yoweri Museveni.

In his argument, he says that all signs seem to be in favor of President Museveni and Mbabazi has no ground to win this election and neither has Besigye and other candidates.

I would not want to go further from his argument although it is very important for me to bring out why I think the Ugandan opposition lost the 2016 election right from the word go.

Unlike other countries, Ugandan opposition politicians lack mentor ship and thus even when they have severally lost, they have failed to negotiate with the election winners to work together and make tangible change in the communities they hail from.

For instance, in 2011, the opposition stopped fighting for all the promises they made to Ugandans only to wait for the five years to elapse. Any normal and understanding Ugandan will not be easily drawn into their campaign trail since it seems duping citizens.

Secondly, the opposition in Uganda lack sellable ideas to the citizens.

It indeed shocks to find a person like Amama Mbabazi who has been an architect of the government for the last 30 years coming up now to say he has new plans and ideas for the country’s citizens, really?

Mr. Besigye makes matters worse especially with his defiance campaign. When you hear what they promise Ugandans, they automatically lack substance.

Recently, other presidential candidates including Dr. Bwanika, Prof. Baryamureeba have joined Besigye’s misguided propaganda of overhauling systems in Uganda. The proposed overhauls according to them include; education system, health and public transport systems.

Whereas there might be shortfalls with the named systems, at least the better language would be improving, or modifying the service delivery systems to ensure quality, it annoys to find that they claim that they have Uganda at heart yet they have been sitting and just wishing and all they can afford now is incite trouble to Ugandans in search of votes.

If at all there was a young and fresh men and women with some fresh ideas among the competitors, then we would be having hopes of positive change from the opposition.

All Ugandans are to do is to choose from what we have been seeing for the past 20 years and so would one think they will choose something different? No.

Ugandans by the end of 18th February they will vote wisely but the opposition will shout that elections were rigged.

Some analysts have gradually argued that what is happening in Uganda is a gradual growth of political maturity which is managed and inspired by the NRM, despite the hiccups, NRM still remains a peaceful mass party.

Of course other political parties have simply got no fortitude to be present during the time of elections and this is partly due to funding. Nevertheless, since the opposition had decided to scatter themselves, let them not be surprised with their imminent loss, though they will get some marginal votes.

In an ideal society, a proper political party must have an agenda that should span for over 10 years or so but not just a few days to the elections. How do you begin trusting the opposition which cannot have clear stands on particular issues in the country?

One thing that I would envision is this opposition that would consistently unite towards doing something that builds the country together with the ruling party. Then, Ugandans trust can be won.

However, when the so-called opposition political parties assume they are a know-all-category of people and they pretend to be clean and continue worse of all to preach the campaigns of defiance which supports violence, Ugandans get messed and the ruling party NRM with our leader president Museveni cannot at any one moment trust in their leadership.

That is why we continue to beseech all Ugandans not to be misguided by the opportunistic opposition but rather think about how to preserve of brighter future. We support the NRM which for long has led our country to an improved economy. We can’t afford to have an economy which will make almost every one of us suffer.

The Writer is a Political Mobilizer.



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