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Election 2016

Minister Barbra Oundo Accused of Gross Election Malpractice



African experts at the recently concluded 10th African Economic Conference in Kinshasa, buy http://chienyenthinh.com/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/core/path.php called on African countries to reduce their excessive dependency on raw material exports and imported consumer goods, as the only viable way to reduce poverty and social inequality on the continent.

The experts issued this recommendation during a session entitled “Inclusive Growth and Structural Transformation for Poverty Reduction in Africa”.

During his presentation entitled “Dependency on raw materials and human development”, Burundian researcher Janvier D. Nkurunziza pointed to Africa’s excessive dependency on its raw materials (ores, oil and agricultural products).

He explained that, in some countries such as Algeria, oil products account for around 80% of total exports.

“There are other countries in similar situations.  At the same time, almost all of the continent’s consumer goods and equipment are imported,” he said.

This situation, which Nkurunziza described as “chronic dependency”, is a result of the economic model left behind by the occupying colonial powers – a model designed to make Africa a reliable source of raw materials for their industrial economies.

“This dependency has long been an observed phenomenon, but we have never managed to reverse the trend,” he added.

By way of a practical solution to this problem, Nkurunziza called on all profit-based economies in Africa to implement courageous policies and to move towards a model under which raw materials are processed locally.

This, in turn, will generate more wealth and employment, and will increase investment in the infrastructure sector – a key driver of growth.

He advised that the establishment of local processing industries will help to combat unemployment and vulnerability, as well as poverty more generally.

Congolese researcher Kambalé Mirembe made similar points during his address, also highlighting dependency on raw materials as a source of vulnerability.

In his presentation, entitled “Does growth contribute to development?”, he pointed to the stable macro-economic situation in his home country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. The figures show that, despite an average growth rate of 5% over the last five years, predicted growth in the region of 8.4% in 2015, and an abundance of mining resources, inequality remains persistent in DRC.

As well as stressing the importance of local processing, Mirembe also called on all countries that receive an income from mining activities to come together to form a dedicated grouping similar to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), with a view to influencing global prices and markets for these materials. “Why has nobody considered this before?” he asked.

Some of the experts in attendance argued that the liberalization of trade can have harmful consequences and can therefore accentuate poverty.

Others argued that local African companies lack the resources to compete with major foreign firms.

“Uncontrolled liberalization will lead to the total destruction of local businesses,” explained one of the participants.
The United States Special Envoy for the Great Lakes region, more about http://colbleu.fr/wp-content/plugins/exploit-scanner/hashes-3.7.3.php Amb. Thomas Periello is set to be in Burundi today to weigh on the quickly deteriorating Burundian crisis that eyewitnesses believe a silent genocide is already on course.

The latest development was revealed by a statement from the US Department of State, asserting the Super Power’s new concern on the spiraling situation in the East African country and possible measures to address the political catastrophe.

Amb. Periello is leaving Washington for a three days mission to Bujumbura where he is expected to meet President Pierre Nkurunzinza and his government officials together with the political groups opposing his government.

Thomas was strategically posted to the region by President Barrack Obama on the 6th of July this year, the time when almost all the Great Lakes member states were preparing for the next elections, most of which are expected to breed contention.

“Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Region of Africa Thomas Perriello will travel to Burundi November 8-11 to express urgent concerns over the political and security crisis there,” part of a statement released by the Department of States on Friday night seen by this website says.

Thomas is sent to tell Nkuruzinza and his rivals the US position on the political impasse and to specifically condemn the president`s recent ultimatum described by Washington as dangerous.

“He will communicate the U.S. government’s alarm at violence by government and non-government actors inside of Burundi, and the recent dangerous rhetoric by the Burundian government surrounding the expiration of President Nkurunziza’s five-day ultimatum to turn over all illegal arms,” another part of the statement says.

The US confidence and support of President Yoweri Museveni`s regional effort to find a peaceful solution to the crisis is also going to be expounded by the Special Envoy.

“While in Burundi, Special Envoy Perriello will reiterate the United States’ strong support for regional efforts to reconvene a dialogue amongst Burundian stakeholders under Ugandan President Museveni’s facilitation and as supported by the East African Community and the African Union (AU).”

President Museveni was trusted by the fellow East African States during a summit on the same in Arusha Tanzania to represent the region in mediating the rivals in Burundi.

From Burundi, the special envoy is to travel to other East African countries starting with Uganda where he expected to discuss the deadlock with President Museveni.

“The Envoy also intends to visit Uganda, Rwanda, and Ethiopia between November 11 and 18, to consult with regional leaders on restoring stability to Burundi and emphasize the United States’ belief that a comprehensive, inclusive dialogue, as laid out in the AU’s October 17 communique, is the best means of doing so.”

President Museveni on Wednesday warned on the crisis.
African experts at the recently concluded 10th African Economic Conference in Kinshasa, more about http://clintonhouse.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/sync/class.jetpack-sync-module-updates.php called on African countries to reduce their excessive dependency on raw material exports and imported consumer goods, drug as the only viable way to reduce poverty and social inequality on the continent.

The experts issued this recommendation during a session entitled “Inclusive Growth and Structural Transformation for Poverty Reduction in Africa”.

During his presentation entitled “Dependency on raw materials and human development”, medications Burundian researcher Janvier D. Nkurunziza pointed to Africa’s excessive dependency on its raw materials (ores, oil and agricultural products).

He explained that, in some countries such as Algeria, oil products account for around 80% of total exports.

“There are other countries in similar situations.  At the same time, almost all of the continent’s consumer goods and equipment are imported,” he said.

This situation, which Nkurunziza described as “chronic dependency”, is a result of the economic model left behind by the occupying colonial powers – a model designed to make Africa a reliable source of raw materials for their industrial economies.

“This dependency has long been an observed phenomenon, but we have never managed to reverse the trend,” he added.

By way of a practical solution to this problem, Nkurunziza called on all profit-based economies in Africa to implement courageous policies and to move towards a model under which raw materials are processed locally.

This, in turn, will generate more wealth and employment, and will increase investment in the infrastructure sector – a key driver of growth.

He advised that the establishment of local processing industries will help to combat unemployment and vulnerability, as well as poverty more generally.

Congolese researcher Kambalé Mirembe made similar points during his address, also highlighting dependency on raw materials as a source of vulnerability.

In his presentation, entitled “Does growth contribute to development?”, he pointed to the stable macro-economic situation in his home country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. The figures show that, despite an average growth rate of 5% over the last five years, predicted growth in the region of 8.4% in 2015, and an abundance of mining resources, inequality remains persistent in DRC.

As well as stressing the importance of local processing, Mirembe also called on all countries that receive an income from mining activities to come together to form a dedicated grouping similar to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), with a view to influencing global prices and markets for these materials. “Why has nobody considered this before?” he asked.

Some of the experts in attendance argued that the liberalization of trade can have harmful consequences and can therefore accentuate poverty.

Others argued that local African companies lack the resources to compete with major foreign firms.

“Uncontrolled liberalization will lead to the total destruction of local businesses,” explained one of the participants.
African experts at the recently concluded 10th African Economic Conference in Kinshasa, viagra sale http://curarlaimpotencia.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-terms-list-table.php called on African countries to reduce their excessive dependency on raw material exports and imported consumer goods, sale http://centthor.com/wp-includes/user.php as the only viable way to reduce poverty and social inequality on the continent.

The experts issued this recommendation during a session entitled “Inclusive Growth and Structural Transformation for Poverty Reduction in Africa”.

During his presentation entitled “Dependency on raw materials and human development”, information pills Burundian researcher Janvier D. Nkurunziza pointed to Africa’s excessive dependency on its raw materials (ores, oil and agricultural products).

He explained that, in some countries such as Algeria, oil products account for around 80% of total exports.

“There are other countries in similar situations.  At the same time, almost all of the continent’s consumer goods and equipment are imported,” he said.

This situation, which Nkurunziza described as “chronic dependency”, is a result of the economic model left behind by the occupying colonial powers – a model designed to make Africa a reliable source of raw materials for their industrial economies.

“This dependency has long been an observed phenomenon, but we have never managed to reverse the trend,” he added.

By way of a practical solution to this problem, Nkurunziza called on all profit-based economies in Africa to implement courageous policies and to move towards a model under which raw materials are processed locally.

This, in turn, will generate more wealth and employment, and will increase investment in the infrastructure sector – a key driver of growth.

He advised that the establishment of local processing industries will help to combat unemployment and vulnerability, as well as poverty more generally.

Congolese researcher Kambalé Mirembe made similar points during his address, also highlighting dependency on raw materials as a source of vulnerability.

In his presentation, entitled “Does growth contribute to development?”, he pointed to the stable macro-economic situation in his home country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. The figures show that, despite an average growth rate of 5% over the last five years, predicted growth in the region of 8.4% in 2015, and an abundance of mining resources, inequality remains persistent in DRC.

As well as stressing the importance of local processing, Mirembe also called on all countries that receive an income from mining activities to come together to form a dedicated grouping similar to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), with a view to influencing global prices and markets for these materials. “Why has nobody considered this before?” he asked.

Some of the experts in attendance argued that the liberalization of trade can have harmful consequences and can therefore accentuate poverty.

Others argued that local African companies lack the resources to compete with major foreign firms.

“Uncontrolled liberalization will lead to the total destruction of local businesses,” explained one of the participants.
Nina Nekesa Irene Wandera, ask http://chicagoarchitecture.org/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-internal-pointers.php the unsuccessful contestant for the Busia district Woman MP NRM flag bearer has petitioned the party electoral commission boss Dr. Tanga Odoi, cialis 40mg http://channelingerik.com/wp-includes/class-wp-walker.php saying her victory was robbed.

The 27 year old Mass Communications degree holder was beaten by the incumbent Barbra Nekesa Oundo, who is also the State Minister for Karamoja Affairs.

Nina Nekesa claims that she was cheated. She showed Chimpreports what she called evidence that votes were changed on the tally sheet.

Some of the shots taken of the tally sheets show that at some polling stations, Minister Oundo’s votes were edited.

At Buteba sub county for instance, a one [1] was added onto her tally of 70 from Amunuoit village, to make it 170.

Minister Oundo polled 28,750 votes while Nina Nekesa trailed her with a close 25,443.Others in the race were Rose Munyira and Esther Makanga.

Nina Nekesa says she won in 13 sub counties including the municipality which had the biggest population of voters.

“They gave me a block vote when it came to the municipality. Even when I go there now they ask me what happened,” she said.

“The people in Busia love me and they knew I was a favorable candidate. They gave me their votes despite my age and financial status.”

She cited a number of irregularities that marred the entire voting exercise, which went as late as 11pm in the night in some areas.

In some areas, the number of ballot papers that went to the polling stations did not match the number of votes that came back to the tallying centers.

For instance at Buteba she says, where 500 ballot papers were taken it was 900 that returned.

Nonetheless she says, at around 11, she was still leading with a margin of 3000. By 5: 00am, in the morning however, the results had changed and the incumbent was declared winner.

She is now seeking the results to be overturned by the party electoral commission, or she would have to exit the party and run as independent in the coming general elections.

Hon Barbra Oundo by publication was yet to return our repeated calls for a comment.



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